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32 results for Water quality management--research
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Record #:
3883
Author(s):
Abstract:
Paleoecologist Sherri Cooper of Duke University is studying core samples from the Neuse and Pamlico estuaries to build a history of the water quality over the centuries. Such studies may reveal some answers about how water quality declined and how possibly it might be regained.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1998, p24-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25091
Author(s):
Abstract:
Citizen collected research is not an uncommon occurrence. Those people helping to collect data on water quality speak about what they learn from both the project and each other. In addition, the pros and cons of participatory research are discussed.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2013, p28-31, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25096
Author(s):
Abstract:
Francois Birgand has developed a new technique using UV-Vis spectrometers that are made to detect water quality. This new method will hopefully help Birgand get a more accurate representation of nutrient fluxes in marshes.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2014, p20-24, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
33178
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early study results confirm that Jordan Lake is one of many eutrophic lakes in North Carolina, but apparently, severe water quality problems have not yet arisen. With funding from the University of North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute, the first stage of a study of the productivity and nutrient status of phytoplankton in Jordan Lake has been completed.
Record #:
33193
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina Natural Resources and Community Development announced a series of nutrient-removal study grants to help local communities control discharges of nitrogen and phosphorus into Jordan Lake and Falls of the Neuse Lake watersheds. The grants stem from a growing concern about possible extensive growth of nuisance blue-green algae in the two reservoirs.
Record #:
33194
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several major cities in North Carolina and the Water Resources Research Institute have formed a new cooperative research venture called the Urban Water Consortium. Toxic chemicals and nutrients in wastewaters from municipalities will be high-priority issues, and a variety of other problems in urban water management will also be investigated.
Record #:
33290
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent study of streams in the City of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County has found several violations of water quality standards but none that appear to present health risks or impair designated uses of the water. The study was conducted by the United States Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.
Record #:
33300
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Human Resources’ Solid and Hazardous Waste Management Branch published a report on managing contaminated ground water in 1984. The report includes case studies of companies that have changed the way they handle their hazardous wastes, and discusses the existence of groundwater in the five hydrogeologic regions of North Carolina.
Record #:
33299
Author(s):
Abstract:
A survey of state regulatory agencies was conducted in 1983 by the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering. The survey showed a trend toward increased use of seasonal discharge standards by state water pollution control agencies, and that they planned to use some degree of flexibility in standards for municipal and industrial discharges.
Record #:
33345
Author(s):
Abstract:
The radioactive gas radon, a common natural constituent of groundwater in North Carolina, is causing increasing concern nationally as a public health problem. A significant public health risk from cancer is associated with radon in the air and in drinking water. Th Water Resources Research Institute is investigating the occurrence of radon in the state’s groundwater.
Record #:
33348
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Water Quality Evaluation Project is a major effort to monitor and evaluate results from agricultural non-point source water quality projects. The program is based at North Carolina State University and sponsored by a cooperative agreement among environmental and agricultural agencies. The program aims to develop best management practices and non-point source water quality control.
Record #:
33357
Author(s):
Abstract:
Researchers at the Water Resources Research Institute examined the combined effects of phosphorus and clay loading on water quality and algal communities in a Piedmont lake. Phosphorus plays a key role in producing nuisance algae in lakes, and turbidity from clay also ranks as a top water quality problem. This article discusses the project and highlights the study’s results.
Record #:
33356
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cape Fear River Basin Study was a two-year effort to address the most critical water issues in North Carolina’s largest river basin. The study, which concluded in 1984, focused on water supply, wetlands, and instream flow needs for fish habitat. A summary report provides a synopsis of the study’s major findings and accomplishments.
Record #:
33459
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency is enforcing new standards for radionucleotides in response to requirements of the new Safe Drinking Water Act. Twenty-eight public and private water systems in North Carolina have been ordered to comply with radium standards. Research is being conducted on identification of radon in high-risk groundwater areas.
Record #:
33465
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill made recommendations for biologically controlling phosphorus releases from the wastewater treatment plant operated by the Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA). The Division of Environmental Management will soon issue regulations limiting phosphorus concentrations in discharges from municipal wastewater treatment facilities into streams feeding nutrient sensitive water bodies.