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11 results for Rivers--North Carolina, Western
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Record #:
2879
Abstract:
For rafters and canoeists, the western mountains offer beautiful scenery and challenging whitewater or placid stretches of rivers, including the Nantahala, New, and French Broad.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 12, May 1996, p22-24, il
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Record #:
9255
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Abstract:
The Chattooga River was important for the “Under the Hill” Cherokees. William Bartram wrote about the river in 1776 as did botanist Arthur Devernon Huger much later. The river changes with the seasons, and the banks are lined with ancient pines and hemlocks as well as sapling maples and basswoods.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 1, June 1978, p24-25, il
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Record #:
9327
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Abstract:
South Fork of the New River is a part of the oldest river system in North America. The gentle mountain river remains one of North Carolina's best-kept travel secrets providing the perfect setting for leisurely canoeists and nature and wildlife enthusiasts. The river is in danger from both ends due to rapid development around Blowing Rock and Boone, and from efforts of the Appalachian Power Company of Virginia seeking to permit damming.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 2, July 1974, p11-14, il
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Record #:
9436
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Abstract:
The Green River, which is actually green when road sediment and other erosion aren't being washed in, flows through Polk and Henderson Counties. The river is narrow and swift in some places and dammed in others. The river has many faces, but fast water with many falls and cataracts provide one of its claims to fame. In this first of three articles on the river, Painter describes the land and the general aspects of the entire river.
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Record #:
9439
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Abstract:
In this concluding article of a three-part series on the Green River, Painter discusses its use, management, and vulnerability.
Record #:
9438
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Abstract:
In this second of three articles on the Green River, Painter describes three well-known sections: the narrows, the cover, and Bradley's Falls.
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Record #:
9707
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Abstract:
The Mead Corporation's Paperboard Mill in Sylva was a major employer for over forty years. It also poured tons of waste into the Tuckasegee River, making the waterway nearly lifeless between Sylva and Fontana Lake. Eventually, a confrontation developed between pro-industry and pro-environment factions. Estes discusses the dispute and its resolution.
Record #:
9771
Author(s):
Abstract:
Above Rosman in the Pisgah National Forest are the headwaters of the French Broad River. It runs free and unfettered from there to the Tennessee line. Pollution has been reduced and among the nation's major river, it remains a waterway of significant historical importance. Davies describes the river's sights and sounds.
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Record #:
9777
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Abstract:
The wild, free-running Horsepasture River flows through Jackson and Transylvania Counties and drops 2,000 feet in 14.8 miles. Plans to build a controversial power plant on it have been delayed for three years while the federal government considers it for inclusion in the Wild and Scenic River Program. Water diverted to the plant along a 2.5 mile stretch would diminish the water flow in five scenic waterfalls. No other state river has so many waterfalls in so short a stretch.
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Record #:
7871
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Abstract:
The headwaters of the Tuckasegee River begin in Panthertown Valley high in Jackson County. From there it rushes down through rugged Bonas Defeat Gorge. Here the rough currents and swirling gravel have cut holes through the rocks in the gorge through countless eons. Downstream the river slows making it ideal for canoeing and excellent for fishing. The river eventually empties into Fontana Lake. Once badly polluted, the Tuckasegee is fast becoming the rejuvenated centerpiece of the region.
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Record #:
35880
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Abstract:
Fashion often comes back around, Ray proved, albeit not through discussing clothing styles. This fashion was a water-borne sport. The appeal of it was asserted through casual attire and inexpensive equipment, an inner tube. Adding to the allure were plenteous places to indulge in the sport, such as Green, Broad, Yadkin, Catawba, and Little Tennessee Rivers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p51, 63