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7 results for French Broad River--Description and travel
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Record #:
23122
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The French Broad River cuts through Asheville and much of western North Carolina. The river offers opportunities for a variety of water activities, including kayaking, whitewater rafting, canoeing, paddleboarding, and tubing. The article suggests two French Broad River day-trips, best explored by kayak or canoe.
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Record #:
24002
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Jack Fisher sought out 756 acres in Madison County in order to create a riverside retreat. This area became French Broad Crossing, which is monitored by the Southeast Regional Conservancy.
Record #:
24003
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Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
24091
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The author discusses the French Broad River's name origins and the various myths surrounding its nomenclature.
Record #:
24105
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The author discusses white water rafting in Asheville and talks about the history of French Broad Rafting Expeditions, the oldest rafting company in the area.
Record #:
24683
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In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his experience traveling down the valley of the French Broad to Hot Springs.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 22, March 1955, p13-14, il
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Record #:
9771
Author(s):
Abstract:
Above Rosman in the Pisgah National Forest are the headwaters of the French Broad River. It runs free and unfettered from there to the Tennessee line. Pollution has been reduced and among the nation's major river, it remains a waterway of significant historical importance. Davies describes the river's sights and sounds.
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