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21 results for North Carolina, Western--Description and travel
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Record #:
783
Author(s):
Abstract:
Staff members and correspondents of THE STATE magazine recommend ten unusual mountain travel opportunities in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 4, Sept 1992, p18-27, il
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Record #:
2671
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in the state's southwestern mountains, the Highlands and Cashiers area is one of the South's most popular vacation areas.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Jan 1996, p44, il
Record #:
2879
Abstract:
For rafters and canoeists, the western mountains offer beautiful scenery and challenging whitewater or placid stretches of rivers, including the Nantahala, New, and French Broad.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 12, May 1996, p22-24, il
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Record #:
3384
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Abstract:
The state's mountains offer camping to appeal to every taste, from rustic backwoods to well-equipped sites. Among the most popular are the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Nantahala and Pisgah national forests.
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Record #:
7886
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The western Piedmont region, which includes Mecklenburg County, where gold was first found in the nation, offers visitors many attractions. Proponents of barbecue say the state's best comes from this region. Furniture, granite, ceramic arts, and sonkers are in the area. Gery describes four places to visit: Boone's Cave Park in Davidson County, a 100-acre parks that is part of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River Trail; Oakboro in Stanly County, a town of 1,200 residents intent on preserving their small town atmosphere; Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge, Anson and Richmond counties, established in 1963 as a haven for wildlife; and Historic Danbury in Stokes County, a town rich in local history.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 4, Apr 2006, p59-63, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
9347
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wright describes the vacation offerings of western North Carolina. These include Ghost Town in the Sky at Maggie Valley, scenic mountain drives, mountain heritage sites, waterfalls, and the Appalachian and Bartram trails.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 7, July 2007, p32-35, il
Record #:
12951
Author(s):
Abstract:
The fifth part in a series presented by The State, this article offers further excerpts from the classic travel journal of John Lawson, describing his trip along the North Carolina frontier in 1700.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 25, May 1960, p17, il
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Record #:
14477
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Abstract:
The Japanese cherry blossoms in Washington and the roses of Picardy have long been famed in story and song, but none of these excels in beauty like the apple blossoms in the mountains of western North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 46, Apr 1948, p9, f
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Record #:
17695
Author(s):
Abstract:
Goerch makes a tour of the western part of the state, listing interesting and enjoyable things to see, including the incredible meal at the Nu Wray Hotel in Burnsville.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 35, Jan 1940, p1-5, il
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Record #:
20585
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Goerch describes his journey through the mountains of western North Carolina. The trip covered 1,006 miles.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 20, Oct 1945, p3-6, 26-27, il
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Record #:
20762
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Goerch provides readers with an account of his airplane trip to visit Asheville, Haywood County's Homer L. Ferguson Day, and various other places in Western North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 27, Nov 1946, p3-5, 19-20, il
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Record #:
22406
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The summer only has so many weekends to pack activities into. The authors describe twenty-one weekends of things to do in Western North Carolina. These include shopping in Swain and Graham counties, rafting and kayaking on the Nantahala River, attending the music festival in Brevard, and strolling through some art studios in Buncombe, McDowell, Mitchell, and Yanncey counties.
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Record #:
23942
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Abstract:
In autumn, the Blue Ridge Parkway bustles with people and the leaves explode with color. From the Cumberland Knob near Mount Airy to Cherokee, the parkway passes a number of beautiful overlooks with spectacular views of the landscape.
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North Carolina Field and Family (NoCar S 1 N672), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Fall 2015, p26-27, 29, il, por
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Record #:
24524
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Abstract:
Western North Carolina is famous for its waterfalls, which bring in tourists from all over the country. This article presents a few of the most popular waterfalls in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 4, September 1977, p8-9, il
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Record #:
24614
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Abstract:
The Blue Ridge Parkway, built by the Works Progress Administration, was intended to be a pleasant driving experience and a way to travel from Shenandoah National Park to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In North Carolina, there are 25 tunnels on the Blue Ridge Parkway, ranging in length from 150 feet to 1,434 feet long.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p140-144, 146, 148, 150, 152, 154, il, map Periodical Website
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