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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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34 results for Lawson, John, 1674-1712
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Record #:
794
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John Lawson, surveyor of and explorer in North Carolina, had extensive dealings and encounters with the Tuscarora Indians of North Carolina; he eventually died at the hands of the Tuscaroras.
Record #:
795
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John Lawson's 1706 description of North Carolina in A NEW VOYAGE TO CAROLINA possesses literary merit that is not frequently acknowledged.
Record #:
793
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John Lawson was an early surveyor of North Carolina, and the founder of Bath and New Bern. His writings are excerpted for this article.
Record #:
4068
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John Lawson, surveyor and explorer of North Carolina, had close ties with New Bern and its founder, Baron von Graffenried. He guided the first settlers to the city's site and later assisted the baron in laying out the city and negotiating with the Indians. Lawson was killed by Indians soon after. In New Bern today, a creek, park, street, and bridge bear his name.
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Record #:
4997
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Russell takes an 11-mile trek with a group of over- sixty hikers, reenacting the trip taken in 1701 by English surveyor John Lawson from Occaneechi Village to Adshuseer. Russell discusses the effect of Lawson's journey on subsequent history and his own feelings on following the explorer's path.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 18 Issue 8, Feb 2001, p22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12073
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Visited by John Lawson during his travels throughout North Carolina in the 1730s, Keyauwee Town, a palisaded Native American village, was re-discovered by Douglas Rights of Winston-Salem in the 1920s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 4, July 1956, p12-13, il
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Record #:
12880
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The second part in a series presented by The State, this article offers further excerpts from the classic travel journal of John Lawson, describing his trip along the North Carolina frontier in 1700.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 20, Feb 1960, p15-16, il
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Record #:
12881
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The third part in a series presented by The State, this article offers further excerpts from the classic travel journal of John Lawson, describing his trip along the North Carolina frontier in 1700.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 21, Mar 1960, p9, il
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Record #:
12944
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The fourth part in a series presented by The State, this article offers further excerpts from the classic travel journal of John Lawson, describing his trip along the North Carolina frontier in 1700.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 23, Apr 1960, p17, il
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Record #:
12951
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The fifth part in a series presented by The State, this article offers further excerpts from the classic travel journal of John Lawson, describing his trip along the North Carolina frontier in 1700.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 25, May 1960, p17, il
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Record #:
14089
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Early explorers to North Carolina met a undocumented, wild environment. John Lawson was the first to describe the natural world in writing. His first volume of work focused on bird species and a second on fish, serpents, and plants. Following him was John Brickell, who plagiarized Lawson but did contribute additional information, especially regarding the potential medicinal qualities of flora and fauna.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 6, July 1948, p10
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Record #:
15128
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Earliest of North Carolinas historians was the Englishman, John Lawson, whose work was first published in 1711, and has been translated and reprinted several times since his death. His work details his journey of a thousand miles through the Indian country, a description of North Carolina, and an account of the Indian tribes which then inhabited the eastern section of the state. Lawson also advanced a theory as the fate of the Lost Colony of Roanoke.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 44, Mar 1941, p7-8
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Record #:
16494
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Two classics of North Carolina colonial writing are John Lawson's \"History of North Carolina\" and Dr. John Brickell's \"The Natural History of North Carolina.\" Each contains a systematic account of the \"beasts\" found in North Carolina.
Record #:
19747
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This article looks at the colonial roots of the Trading Path, an extremely popular travel and trade route through North Carolina that would later become the route for a system of 20th century highways. The article utilizes period accounts of exploration and travel along the path as well as descriptions of encounters with various Indian tribes with a particular focus on the travels of surveyor John Lawson, traders James Needham and Gabriel Arthur, and explorer John Lederer.
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Record #:
20718
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This article examines Dr. John Brickell's publication of \"The Natural History of North Carolina\" in 1737, a very close copy of John Lawson's \"History of Carolina\" (c1708), examining if Brickell's work was genuine or if it was plagiarized from Lawson.
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