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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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38 results for Upland Gazette
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Record #:
16435
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Researchers at North Carolina State University have completed a four-year study to determine the impacts of pesticides and ditch bank cover on quail populations in eastern North Carolina. This article presents the findings.
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Record #:
16437
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One of the state's noblest traditions--quail hunting--is in danger of extinction. Prior to the 1970s, more than 175,000 hunters came to the state and harvested between 2.2 and 2.8 million quail. During the 1995 season only 28,000 hunters harvested 225,000 quail. Jones discusses reasons for the decline and whether it can be reversed. In the state quail are declining at 6.2 percent per year from 1982 to 1991.
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Record #:
16441
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, and N.C. State University have teamed up to initiate a major quail and songbird project. This article provides excerpts from several studies, including the Virginia Quail Nesting Study (completed) and Tall Timbers Quail Research (ongoing) and the Albany Area Quail Management Project (ongoing).
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Record #:
16438
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Squirrels are still a favorite game animal for many North Carolina hunters, and they are found in all three of the state's geographic divisions. The squirrel is a small, tough, and agile creature, and getting it requires good basic hunting skills. Padgett describes hunting seasons and ways landowners can attract squirrels to their property.
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Record #:
16439
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Pen-raised quail are useful for training dogs and for stocking on heavily used, controlled-shooting preserves. However, there is as yet no documented evidence that the release system results in long-term quail restoration. The writer says the best way to restore quail is to restore the habitat first.
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Record #:
16440
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This article discusses using native warm-season grass meadows cover and food for small game, mammals, and songbirds. Wildflowers, while creating a pleasant view, also attract butterflies and hummingbirds. The article includes a chart of grasses and wildflowers, the time to plant and the amount per acre.
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Record #:
16436
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The habitat of the fox squirrel, the larger and more colorful relative of the gray squirrel, has declined in the Southeastern Coastal Plain through unrestricted logging and a lack of controlled burning. Jones reports on a restoration project to begin at Cherry Point during January and February, 1997.
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Record #:
16453
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These surveys answered by quail hunters and grouse hunters over the past thirteen years provide biologists at the North Carolina Division of Wildlife Management with a large set of data to compare hunting success through the years and across regions--Coastal Plain and Piedmont for quail and Northern and Southern Mountains for grouse.
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Record #:
16455
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There has been a decline in quail and seventeen other bird species associated with farming and weedy, grassy, brushy habitats in North Carolina and other Southeastern states. Bromley, Bill Palmer, and Marc Puckett investigated whether pesticides and drainage ditch management were possible causes. Results are reported. Also included is a set of nine questions, which the author says will be a large, complex research project seeking to account for the decline, and which he hopes will be answered by the end of the century.
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Record #:
16456
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The American woodcock is one of the most widespread game birds in North America. Although it is known by at least thirty names, including big-eyed John, bogsucker, and timberdoodle, it remains one of the least known and understood game birds. The article provides information on the woodcock, such as its appearance and behaviors, and stresses the importance of habitat maintenance to insure its stability.
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Record #:
16454
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The manufacturer of the Anchor Covey Release system responds to the \"Pen-Raised Bird Issue\" article in the Summer 1997 Upland Gazette and provides a different point of view on pen-raised quail.
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Record #:
16548
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Evans with the Southern Appalachian Chapter of the Ruffed Grouse Society and Ashburn of North Carolina Quail Unlimited discuss recent accomplishments in improving conditions for upland game birds and future directions of their respective organizations.
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Record #:
16609
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This article is written from the assumption that predators--opossum, fox, raccoon, and skunk--are having a negative effect on quail populations and examines what can be done by trappers and hunters to increase the number of predators harvested.
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Record #:
16768
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This article focuses on land management as the key to producing small game and features three landowners who are participating in the Forest Stewardship Program. Each section is written by a Forest Stewardship Biologist. Featured landowners are Piedmont Region--Harold Riddick; Mountain Region--David Bowers; Coastal Region--Dr. Glenn Hair.
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Record #:
16769
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There are a number of federally funded programs to assist landowners with conservation projects, such as increased wildlife populations, improved water quality, and wetlands protection. Knight briefly describes three of them--the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP); Environmental Quality Incentives (EQIP); and Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP).
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