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17 results for Recipes
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Record #:
22591
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North Carolina's aquaculture and mariculture industries produce many species that are popular for many dinner tables. Local farms produce trout, catfish, bass, shrimp, and various shellfish that contribute $57 million to the state's economy.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p34-35, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31254
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This article presents a selection of the finest family recipes in North Carolina. Citizens share their stories and recipes, and describe the meaning of the dishes. Several of the recipes are for pork chops, jam cake, cornbread, molasses cake, honey buns, and spaghetti.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 11, Nov 2000, p19-22, il
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Record #:
31643
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Colonial cookery in North Carolina was chiefly English with native ingredients adapted to taste. Most of the cooking involved the extensive use of spices, herbs, and wine, and was done over an open fire or in dutch ovens. Select colonial recipes are presented from “A Tryon Palace Trifle” cookbook by Jeremy North.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, July 1975, p8-9, il
Record #:
34771
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Abstract:
Gunger, a molasses flavored cake, remains a Harkers Island tradition. The author, Ann Moore, attributes Gunger to Carteret County’s local history of maritime traditions. Early trade routes between the West Indies and North Carolina brought sugar products to the state, notably sugar and molasses. The recipe for Gunger is included in the article, recorded by the author’s grandmother.
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Record #:
34778
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Four summer recipes are selected from the Mariner’s Menu, North Carolina Sea Grant’s seafood resource book. Recipes include snapper with tropical fruit salsa, seafood stuffed avocado, grilled scallop kabobs, and Carolina shrimp broil.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2018, p40-41, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34838
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Sausage balls have a long history in North Carolina, but can be found elsewhere around the United States too. These cost-effective snacks are quick to make and beloved by many. This article includes a recipe from Neese’s Country Sausage, a Greensboro-based operation that has been making spicy sausage for several generations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p134-140, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34836
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Nationally-ranked chef Ricky Moore discusses his step-grandfather’s Christmas ham and beans recipe. Moore still recreates his own version of the recipe with his family, and brings the same creativity to his own restaurants in Durham, Saltbox Seafood Joints.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p126-128, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34837
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Abstract:
Ham has been a long-time tradition of the holidays, dating back centuries in Europe. In North Carolina, Left Bank Butchery in Saxapahaw specializes in everyday hams and meats, but works overtime for the holidays.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p131-132, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34858
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The three basic components of a pie are the crust, filling, and meringue. If a baker can perfect these three skills, then any pie can be created.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
34950
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Foy Allen Edelman of Raleigh, North Carolina has published two cookbooks focusing on recipes from almost every county in North Carolina. This five-year long journey began with collecting recipes from civic organizations, archival research, and sitting down to talk with people in their kitchens. She has since donated her entire collection to the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections at Walter Clinton Jackson Library at University of North Carolina Greensboro.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p184-190, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35084
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Told from the perspective of an uncle to some children, this is a story of how a hunting dog was able to track down opossums from laying in a wheelbarrow when he was too old to walk. There is a recipe for pine bark stew at the end.
Record #:
35426
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Included in this article about baked beans: how Boston become Beantown, a profile for Midwood Smokehouse, Charlotte; recipes offering a baked beans version for fans of this dish’s tradition version and sweet-spicy version for more adventurous palate.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 7, July 2015, p28
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Record #:
36848
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Abstract:
Charles Heatherly became a beekeeper when his source for his favorite type of honey was no longer available. In this interview, he explains the workings of bee culture, and how to harvest honey and cultivate their natural resources. “Stella Daniel’s Orange Carrot Cake” recipe is included at the end of the article.
Record #:
36574
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Abstract:
Church picnics on the grounds meant the occasion took place in its churchyard or cemetery. As for the day designated, sometimes it was Decoration Day, at other times a cemetery cleanup or homecoming. No matter the day or occasion, it always involved traditional Appalachian dishes, illustrated in the accompanying photo. The author noted recipes such as dried green beans cooked with fatback called “leather britches” and stack cake made with alternating layers of cake and dried fruit.
Record #:
36437
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Abstract:
The author traveled to all 100 counties in North Carolina to seek out local cooks and their recipes and stories. A sampler of this collection is reproduced in this article.