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13 results for Food--North Carolina
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Record #:
15428
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There are several dishes not generally known outside of certain regions of North Carolina, but are common in small towns and passed down for generations. These include persimmon pudding, scuppernong pie, and the sausage-like Tom Thumb.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 25, Nov 1936, p7
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Record #:
16044
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Exploration of the state's foodways reveals a movement for small gas stations to offer groceries and fare from local farmers. Typically known to locals, a handful of such places are highlighted for their dedication to offering more than the typical convenient store or fast food eats to travelers.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 6, Feb 2012, p14-17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
16590
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The James Beard Awards are the Oscars of the food world. This year the Awards Honor nine NC masters of cuisine with prestigious national recognition.
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Record #:
17028
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Two sisters, Mrs. Marie Long Land and Mrs. Lois Long Riker, took an ancestor's recipe for watermelon-rind pickle and developed it into a business called the Dixie Dame Company, located in Statesville. The sisters began their business three years ago and have since expanded to include other products which are sold in the state and around the country.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 31, Jan 1938, p3, 16, por
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Record #:
19768
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The fish stews created in eastern North Carolina are more than just an ordinary folk meal. Similar in meaning to a pig picking, fish stews are highly ritualized and symbolic social events. A festive but informal meal, fish stews are often prepared for large crowds who gather to enjoy one another's company while the meal cooks. The unpretentiousness of the meal reflects favorably to a people who value reality over appearances.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. Issue 12, 2003, p130-132, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24811
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Wimpies Steam Bar and Grill has undergone renovations and introduced a new seasonal schedule for its reopening. The changes include a roving oyster shucker, new bar area, patio area, and paved parking lot. New items have also been added to the menu to compliment old favorites. Wimpies Steam Bar and Grill has been serving food to Winterville for more than 20 years.
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Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p16-27, il, por
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Record #:
27044
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The Triangle’s food community continues to thrive and expand, as does its national acclaim. Buying and eating locally is becoming easier as farmers markets and food trucks continue to pop up, and organic food education spreads. Craft breweries and cold-press juice bars have also infiltrated the Triangle.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p14-16, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27734
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A field guide to pork rinds, cracklin, and chicharrons. The different kinds of pork rinds, how they are made, their history, and where you can find them in the Triangle area are explored. Their popularity has increased lately with the new trend in dieting. The wash pot style, pork rinds, crackin, fried cracklin, and fat back are all described and detailed. JP Trostle is both illustrator and author.
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Record #:
28362
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The food of North Carolina is compared with that of California and New York by a food writer who recently moved to the state. Jeanne Voltz believes that North Carolina’s food makes her feel at home and praises the balance between trendy and old fashioned foods. North Carolina has a wide selection of fresh and local varieties not seen elsewhere and some of the best bread in the US.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 6, February 1992, p26 Periodical Website
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Record #:
28593
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In a new series of dinners taking place around Charlotte, black chefs in the city aim to put an end to stereotypes and show their range in the kitchen. A recent Soul Food Sessions dinner explored African food with six African-American chefs working in the south cooking together for the meal. The black chefs knew they would be stereotyped and guests would expect them to cook soul food, and so they did. Each chef is profiled, their reasons for cooking are shared, and the reason for the dish selection is detailed.
Record #:
28594
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After looking at cookbooks from the 1960s and 1970s, Cat Carter found a recipe for country-style steak that dated to 1752 and came from the Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church in Chester County. Carter details how she then went to the church to ask about their food culture and history and what the congregation members shared with her. The recipes detail the food culture and history of the south over the past couple three centuries.
Record #:
36517
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The author gives a memory filled overview of the favorite foods in North Carolina from the past and the ever changing availability of other ethnic foods and new favorites as our palates change.
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Record #:
36437
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The author traveled to all 100 counties in North Carolina to seek out local cooks and their recipes and stories. A sampler of this collection is reproduced in this article.