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36 results for Culture--North Carolina
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Record #:
19570
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In this re-printing of his December 4, 1924 address before the State Literary and Historical Association, Jackson discusses a criticism of the post-confederate American south by essayist H.L. Mencken in which the region is described as completely lacking in culture and civilization.
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Record #:
19841
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North Carolina provides a multitude of opportunities for residents and visitors to experience the differences found in the types of foods of the state. These differences can be explained by the geographical and cultural differences found between different communities and regions of North Carolina.
Record #:
20238
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Following the American Revolution, defeated Loyalists fled to the remote corner of Abaco in The Bahamas. Since then, the descendants of those Loyalists have maintained a population that is racially, culturally, and politically distinct from the other twenty-nine populated islands that make up The Bahamas. The Abaco population more closely resembles isolated communities on Ocracoke and Harkers Island, where the population still speaks with a brogue, resembling the tongue spoken by the earliest Scot-Irish settlers.
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Record #:
21724
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This article examines how the Cherokee Nation, especially its mothers, tried to adapt to the cultural changes forced on them by white Americans during the late 18th and early 19th century while also maintaining their own traditional culture. The efforts by Christian missionaries to 'civilize' the Cherokee people are also discussed and the matrilineal structure and child raising practices of Cherokee society.
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North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 87 Issue 4, Oct 2010, p403-430 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
21816
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This article examines the relationship between Confederate identity and conceptions of Christianity, manhood, patriotism, and class in the antebellum South through the wartime diary of North Carolina lawyer and Confederate bureaucrat David Schenck.
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Record #:
27289
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Sorgum syrup has been a tradition in the mountains of North Carolina for years. Now the syrup’s popularity is spreading throughout the state due to a number of chef’s using it in their dishes.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p182-184, 186, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27024
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Party Illegal is Durham’s longest running electronic dance party, organized by local artists and musicians who work in creative contrast to the privileged tendencies of downtown Durham's current redevelopment. For them, Durham's new identity has repeatedly proven itself to be insensitive to race, class, and gender issues. Party Illegal addresses most of those through something as seemingly simple as a monthly dance party.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 7, Feb 2016, p18-19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27578
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As the Triangle area and the South culture changes, funerals and funeral culture has stayed the same. The types of funerals people attend are categorized using the books of famous Southern authors. William Faulkner’s, Mark Twain’s, Reynolds Price’s, and Eudora Welty’s stories about funerals are used to determine whether a funeral will be about the motivations of relatives of the deceased, intense emotions of happiness, sadness, or humor, or exaggerations of the deceased’s life, personality, and accomplishments.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 41, December 14-20 1989, p9-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27619
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The Southern Folklife Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Wilson Library is the home to a collection of music, writing, artifacts, and other folk art. The collection portrays a picture of the complex cultural factors in the South. The collection features over 300,000 items and is the archive is open to the public. Some of the more unique pieces are discussed.
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Record #:
27735
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University of North Carolina graduates are making their mark on pop culture. Joseph Headen coined the word “bruh” and has used its popularity to build a business around the word. Chris Kelly has created shows and content for Carton Network’s Adult Swim. Headen and Kelly have both had their content transformed into viral memes and viewed by millions of people. Their inspirations and success stories are shared along with other area residents who have worked on popular tv shows.
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Record #:
27878
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North Carolina residents gather at the weekly Picking & Grinning at Schley Grange Hall outside Hillsborough. The two-hour gathering has been going on for ten years and brings residents together to hear, sing, and play gospel and country music. The gatherings sometimes have as many as two hundred attend and all are invited to participate. The sessions are important to members of the community, especially older individuals and celebrate their musical heritage.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 10, March 2010, p22-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
27936
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The events that take place at the Wake County Speedway are explored. Kristin Gault and Robert Arch talk about their motivations for racing. They also discuss how competing against each other effects their romantic relationship. Other drivers and individuals at the racetrack talk about the atmosphere and racing the speedway.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 21, May 2010, p16-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
27947
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The history of when pimento cheese first appeared, its popularity in North Carolina and the south, and its cultural importance are explored. The Triangle area with Charlotte is the biggest market in the nation for pimento cheese. Ruth’s Salads of Charlotte is the top producer of the cheese in the nation. Pimento cheese gained popularity due to the fact it was cheap to make, tasted good, and convenient to take to work.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 21, May 2010, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27948
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Making rocking chairs is an art. Elia Bizzarri from Pittsboro and Brian Boggs from Asheville both teach students how to make rocking chairs. Bizzarri uses a 2,000 year old process and makes the majority of the chair with hand tools. Suggestions are provided for finding the most comfortable and highest quality rocking chair and the importance of the rocking chair in our culture is explored. Photographs showing the steps to making a rocking chair as shown by Bizzarri are provided
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 21, May 2010, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28006
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Women in the Triangle discuss modern feminism and the do-it-yourself culture(DIY). Triangle women discuss how they are choosing not to participate in the industrialized food culture. They say they do things like sew, garden, can food, and more to improve the quality of their family’s lives. These women also discuss how important community is to their participation in these activities and how they can complete them while working full-time jobs and having a family.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 34, August 2010, p24-25 Periodical Website