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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Cemeteries
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Record #:
2022
Abstract:
Since the 1700s, the Southern folk cemetery has been a means of family identification and bonding over generations, but with increased family mobility in the 20th-century the traditions of the folk cemetery are being abandoned.
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Record #:
2037
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Graves and cemeteries are normally not considered eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, and those that are must reflect strict criteria. North Carolina does not have a single individually listed grave in the Register.
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Record #:
3299
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Abstract:
Begun in 1979, the North Carolina Cemetery Survey Project seeks to locate and record cemeteries in the state with graves dated before 1913, the year the state began keeping death certificates.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 57 Issue 1, June 1989, p3, il
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Record #:
9484
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Raleigh's Historic Cemetery and Mausoleum is located in the center of Historic Oakwood, the city's revitalized Victorian neighborhood. Raleigh businessman and plantation owner Henry Mordecai donated 2 and one-acres for the cemetery in 1867. Today it covers 102 acres and is the resting place of 1,500 Confederate soldiers and sailors and four Confederate generals, as well as other great and ordinary individuals who populated Raleigh and the state.
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Record #:
15774
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The Cemetery Survey and Stewardship Program was developed by the Office of Archives and History to preserve and protect North Carolina's overlooked cemeteries. Guardianship of these cemeteries was largely under the charge of local historians and as of 2002 seventeen counties had complete survey records. The program aims to organize records, provide technical advice, and create a database to account for these resources before any are lost.
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Record #:
24540
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The North Carolina Historical Marker E-5 is located near the Franklin-Warren County line and marks the grave site of Robert E. Lee’s oldest daughter. Annie Carter Lee died of typhoid fever while at Jones Springs Hotel.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 9, February 1976, p21-22, il
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Record #:
24552
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The small town of Kittrell, North Carolina was once a refuge for Confederate soldiers and is now the site of the Confederate Cemetery, which is made up of 52 graves of soldiers who died in Kittrell Springs Hospital.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 1, June 1973, p18-20, il
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Record #:
24593
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Abstract:
General Thomas Fenwick Drayton was an illustrious Confederate soldier who now lies in Elwood Cemetery in grave in Charlotte, North Carolina. This article pays tribute to the soldier’s accomplishments in life and during the Civil War.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 3, July 1964, p9-10, 37, il, por
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Record #:
24636
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An old burying ground at Beaufort has been in use since the early 1700s and sheds light on the history of the area. The grave is the final resting place of such historical figures as Col. William Thompson (1736-1781) and Captain Otway Burns (1775-1850).
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 18, February 1959, p11, 20, il
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Record #:
16109
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The Committee for the Study of Abandoned Cemeteries in North Carolina was formed by the General Assembly and charged with surveying selected counties including; Lenoir, Halifax, Rutherford, Moore, Hyde, Guilford, and Madison. The popularity and importance of the committee's work caught on and those involved asked volunteers to survey the remaining counties.
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Record #:
22468
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The Spratt burying-ground in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina is one of the oldest burying places in the state. Many of the inscriptions on tombstones found in the graveyard pre-date the American Revolution.
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Record #:
31303
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The North Carolina Cemetery Survey Project is seeking volunteers to record all cemeteries containing graves dated before 1913. The effort began in 1979, when the General Assembly created the Abandoned Cemeteries Study Committee to determine the condition of these forsaken cemeteries throughout the state. Since birth and death statistics were not kept officially in North Carolina before 1913, the only records available for many citizens are in graveyards.
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Record #:
34441
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Biddleville Cemetery is a 145-year-old burial plot in Charlotte where black veterans of both world wars and the Spanish-American War rest. Until recently, the cemetery had not been listed as an official cemetery or tied to any one specific church. Local resident Nolie Steele helped to recognize and protect Biddleville Cemetery as an official historic Mecklenburg County landmark, and continues to research the veterans who are buried there so that their graves can be marked.
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Record #:
34976
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After the Fontana Dam was built in the 1944, seventeen miles of the Fontana Valley area was flooded. Family cemeteries that were above the flood waters have since been restored by the National Park Service under the direction of former resident Helen Cable Vance. Every Sunday between April and October, a group of people go to one of the twenty-seven family cemeteries for its Decoration Day.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p154-160, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35615
Abstract:
While traveling in Transylvania, Romania, the author took note of the various epitaphs and pictures that were present on tombstones.