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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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24 results for Hunting dogs
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Record #:
1144
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The annual Coon Dog Day in Saluda is a tradition that has been passed down through several generations to the present.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 2, July 1993, p16-18, il
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Record #:
20829
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The dog breeds of the North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association (NAVHDA), mostly of continental European descent, are expected to perform a number of hunting activities like pointing, retrieving upland birds on land and in water, track furred or feathered game on land, and be cooperative yet independent while doing so. The article includes four kinds of tests to see how many of these skills each dog has and pictures and a brief sketch of the breeds in the Carolinas chapter.
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Record #:
23741
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The demands of early pioneer life in the Blue Ridge Mountains shaped North Carolina's Plott hound, a loyal hunting companion with the ability to track, corner, or tree an animal ten times its size.
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Record #:
24844
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Keith Hendrickson reminisces about the time he spent hunting with a friend’s father, Mr. B. He relays the tale of the time he took his new Boykin Spaniel on a duck hunt with Mr. B and the hilarity that ensued.
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Record #:
9501
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Duffey describes some of North Carolina's favorite breeds of hunting dogs, including retrievers, trailers, and pointers.
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Record #:
700
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Champion hunting dog trainer John Weller offers advice on how to train your own dog.
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Record #:
27392
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A guide on how to keep one’s hunting dog safe, as well as what to do in emergency situations involving the hunt, explained through some of Marsh’s personal experiences with his hunting dog. He tries to cover most dangers one could face on the hunt with their dog.
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Record #:
27398
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A group of rabbit hunters who have been hunting together for 30 years share tales of their hunting expeditions with their beagles, and share their hopes that rabbit hunting will continue in the future.
Record #:
31675
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Cortez Dean is a veteran coon-hunter who raises and trains his own award-winning dogs. He and fellow members of the Rocky River Coon Hunters Association conduct regular tests on how well their dogs perform. Dean is also involved in regular dog shows and runs a country store south of Pittsboro, which also serves as the association’s headquarters.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 10, Oct 1974, p12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34725
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The annual North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association held in Fall 2017 in the Sandhills Game Land. It presents an opportunity to showcase trained hunting dogs in a myriad of skills, from duck retrieval and search to desire to work. Author Mike Zlotnicki participated with his dog Annie and discusses the lessons that he learned along the way.
Record #:
35084
Abstract:
Told from the perspective of an uncle to some children, this is a story of how a hunting dog was able to track down opossums from laying in a wheelbarrow when he was too old to walk. There is a recipe for pine bark stew at the end.
Record #:
35366
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The story about how a very smart hunting dog went looking for a large raccoon, and the owner followed him until he was very lost, and ended up living in a cave with an American Indian woman for two years, before finding his way home and getting sent to fight in World War 2.
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Record #:
35460
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When a man went in a barbershop for a haircut, the other patrons started telling exaggerated stories about how great some of their dogs were.
Record #:
36162
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Dogs handlers were traditionally men in middle and late adulthood, noted the author. Since the 1980s, though, he’d observed women increasingly becoming part of the sport’s ranks. Profiles of four women and description of wild bird hunting proved dog handling and its associated activities were indiscriminate regarding sex and gender.