NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


32 results for Folk tales--North Carolina
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
16363
Author(s):
Abstract:
The New Hope community is located on the Iredell County side of the Wilkes-Iredell County border. Despite its proximity to more urban ways of life, New Hope maintains much of its traditional rural heritage. Witch stories are quite common in this area; Stone gives several examples.
Record #:
16427
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of the many folktales collected in the northeastern counties of North Carolina, there are but two that tell of the exploits and adventures of John, the well-known mythic hero of mountain lore. Of these, and perhaps both, went against the folklore current, and moved eastward from the mountains onto the coastal plains.
Record #:
16442
Abstract:
West African, West Indian, and North Carolinian cultures define their spirit creatures in strikingly similar ways. This article examines parallels not just in folktales but actual cultural retention and diffusion of concepts of African origin as well.
Record #:
35127
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of how a giant worm, also called a dragon, terrorized a town until it was slain. The knight who killed the worm had help from a witch, and he and his family was then cursed for not following the witch’s directions precisely.
Record #:
35138
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is an excerpt from a book the author was currently working on, and dealt with her brief time spent in a mountain settlement, trying to separate folktale from truth.
Record #:
35139
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of how a town full of illiterate people gained their information in 1814, by electing the one man in town who could read as their county reader.
Record #:
35153
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article contains the folktales “The Mouse got Drowned in the Cabbage Pot,” and “The Little Round House,” which includes illustrations.
Record #:
35241
Abstract:
Starting with a brief biography of her father, Ms. Currin recorded several stories, tall tales, and anecdotes that Joe Currin had told. These tales are categorized by hunting and fishing, local characters, numskull tales, and miscellaneous.
Record #:
35252
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is the analysis of symbolism and folklore in the novel “The Track of the Cat.” The novel contains elements of animal symbolism, good versus evil, fear of the unknown, gender stereotypes, and death.
Record #:
35447
Author(s):
Abstract:
Romulus Linney wrote Heathen Valley in 1962 about a group of peoples residing in the North Carolina Mountains and how they responded to an overly zealous missionary. The story is filled with folk speech, myths, traditional medicine, and other folk elements to portray the characters as accurately as possible.
Record #:
35460
Author(s):
Abstract:
When a man went in a barbershop for a haircut, the other patrons started telling exaggerated stories about how great some of their dogs were.
Record #:
35459
Abstract:
Two stories, “The One-mule Wagon Speedster in Chapel Hill,” and “The Dove-Gassaway Fight,” told to the author.
Record #:
35495
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a synopsis of the novel Sea-Gift, written by Edwin W. Fuller in 1873. The author of the article believes this to be the earliest example of tall tale narratives in America.
Record #:
35541
Abstract:
The ghost story of “the vanishing hitchhiker” is an internationally known folktale, about a woman who hitches a ride, and then disappears, marking her as a ghost. Five variations of this story have been recorded and reproduced in this article.