NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


18 results for Hunters and hunting
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
26413
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dave Hall is a North Carolina waterfowl hunter and special agent for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. His father taught him to be an ethical hunter and follow the rules, in order to preserve the future of duck hunting.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1994, p4-5, il
Record #:
26415
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time, market hunting was an acceptable practice because natural resources seemed to be unlimited. Now we know that there is a limit. To be good stewards, hunters and other outdoor recreationists must promote respect and awareness.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1994, p6, il
Record #:
26453
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bob Hazel is head of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s wildlife enhancement committee. This committee focuses on habitat preservation and management, and landowner and sportsmen relations. Bob is concerned about the future of hunting, and leads efforts to promote hunter education programs.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 39 Issue 40(1), Jan/Feb 1992, p7-8, por
Record #:
26469
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hunters in North Carolina have been pushing for tougher hunter safety laws, banding together for hunter ethics. However, recent events blame hunters for fatal shootings and have spurred an anti-hunting movement.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1991, p4-5, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26516
Author(s):
Abstract:
While state lawmakers have passed mandatory blaze orange laws, they have been ineffective. At the end of the big game hunting season on January 1, six accidental hunting deaths were reported in North Carolina. Only one of the victims was wearing blaze orange.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1990, p12, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26545
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Federation began out of the labor of hunters and anglers concerned about the future of wildlife resources in the state. Conservation programs funded by sportsmen have resulted in many wildlife populations increasing to all-time high levels.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1990, p3-4, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26553
Author(s):
Abstract:
Maligned and misunderstood, modern hunters are under increasing scrutiny. In response to the current anti-hunting sentiment, the North Carolina Wildlife Federation is acting on several fronts to ensure that properly regulated hunting and properly managed wildlife go hand in hand.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1990, p6-7, il
Record #:
26584
Author(s):
Abstract:
Conflict between landowners and hunters occasionally occurs in North Carolina, as public hunting lands become more crowded. There is still private land for hunting, but finding it takes resourcefulness, honesty and plain old-fashioned courtesy.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 4, July/Aug 1989, p6-8, il, por
Record #:
26581
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the editor Eddie Nickens, a strict adherence to game laws doesn’t mean you have to agree with all of them. But the laws represent the only standard we have of judging our sporting behavior, and are part of our hunting heritage.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 4, July/Aug 1989, p3, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26591
Author(s):
Abstract:
There is considerable debate over fee hunting in North Carolina. Many argue they have the right to hunt and should not have to pay a fee. The dilemma is further complicated by land owner rights and public land access.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1989, p9-11, il
Record #:
26597
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Gary San Julian, wildlife extension specialist at North Carolina State University, offers his perspective on animal rights and wildlife management. The animal rights movement is directly opposed to hunting and has organized a large audience of supporters. Hunters must take time to learn about the claims against their sport and work to explain their hunting ethics and ideals.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1988, p6
Record #:
26633
Author(s):
Abstract:
Paying farmers for hunting rights will open up more lands for hunters in North Carolina. Lands leased may receive some degree of active management for wildlife and provide better hunting than public lands.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1987, p6, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26719
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission completed a big game hunters survey that tells who hunts what in the state. The results show that whitetail deer are the most sought-after quarry.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 4, July/Aug 1984, p8, il
Record #:
26935
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hunter’s Clays began in England to reproduce the kinds of shots most frequently encountered by bird shooters. Its growing popularity has spread to the United States, and hunters hope that it will become a major shooting sport in this country. Competition is strictly local and conducted among club members and hunting companions.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p6
Subject(s):
Record #:
7222
Author(s):
Abstract:
The number of wild turkeys harvested during the winter hunting season of 2005 declined from the 2004 season. There were 151 turkeys harvested in 2005, compared with 181 in 2004. Stokes County ranked first with twenty-three birds, and Person and Surry Counties reported the fewest birds with seven each. Harvest numbers reflect the participation of hunters in each county rather than the turkey populations. Overall, North Carolina's wild turkey population exceeds 130,000.
Full Text: