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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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31 results for Wild turkeys
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Record #:
4133
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Overhunting and increasing human population brought about the decline of the wild turkey across the country from millions to around 30,000 at the start of the 20th-century. The National Wild Turkey Federation sponsors Target 2000, a project that seeks to restore the wild turkey nationwide by the year 2000. By April, 1999, the state's wild turkey population will reach 100,000, with habitats in all 100 counties.
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Record #:
7845
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission restocks and relocates wild turkeys to suitable habitats. These activities have brought the state's wild turkey population to a forty-year-high. Several counties recently reported the finding of pen-raised turkeys in their fields and woodlands. Release of pen-raised birds can spread disease to the wild stock as well as weaken their ability to survive in the wild by interbreeding.
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Record #:
9435
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission plans to restore wild turkeys to all suitable habitats throughout the states. This article discusses turkey restoration in Macon County, particularly in the county's Cowee Range.
Record #:
9619
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When North Carolina's wild turkey population reached its lowest point at 2,000 birds statewide around 1970, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the National Wild Turkey Federation joined forces to develop a restoration plan.
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Record #:
25932
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R. Wayne Bailey of Milton, North Carolina has recently received one fo the 1973 American Motors Conservation Awards which are presented to those dedicated to the efforts in the field of renewable natural resources. Bailey, a biology with the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, is a pioneer in developing progressive management and restoration programs for wild turkey.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Summer 1973, p3
Record #:
6589
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In this WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA series about wildlife species in the state, Amundson describes the wild turkey. There are seven varieties of wild turkeys in North America; the species native to North Carolina is the Eastern wild turkey. Amundson discusses the characteristics, breeding and food habits, management, and enemies of the turkey.
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Record #:
6781
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The wild turkey is North Carolina's most highly prized game bird. However, its future is uncertain. Either it will continue to flourish in many parts of the state, or it will be reduced to a few state-managed or private areas for hunting. Gooden discusses major problems affecting the wild turkey's future, including good turkey management, providing suitable habitats, and reducing disturbances in habitat areas.
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Record #:
6786
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In Part 2 of his discussion of management problems of North Carolina's wild turkey population, Gooden discusses turkey hunting laws and possible revisions; illegal hunting; misconceptions about raising turkeys in captivity and using them for restocking; and turkey diseases caused by the use of certain fertilizers in fields where turkeys forage.
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Record #:
8194
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In much of North Carolina wild turkey hunting is a very unproductive sport. Only a few counties have turkey populations that are in good shape and able to increase the numbers in the flock. These flocks prosper only in areas where they are protected from indiscriminate hunting. Partin discusses reasons for the decline in the turkey population and its prospects for survival in the future.
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Record #:
8208
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Two problems confront wild turkey restoration in North Carolina. One is habitat fragmentation. At one time the wild turkey population stretched from Manteo to Murphy, but with expansion of human population much of the turkey's habitats have been eliminated or reduced in size. The second problem is public indifference. Cherry explores each of these problems and analyzes what must be done to keep wild turkeys from becoming extinct in North Carolina.
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Record #:
8881
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The author discusses questions concerning winter hunting seasons for wild turkeys, male-only seasons, and the use of dogs.
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Record #:
8911
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The wild turkey is numerous in some counties and nonexistent in others; however, nothing is known about what controls the turkey's distribution or various densities. Between 1934 and 1954, the state “lost” the wild turkey in fifteen counties, and the decline continues. To help to reverse this trend, the winter hunting season was recently abolished. Bailey discusses reasons for this.
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Record #:
9020
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On December 18, 1972, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission voted to ban the use of pen-raised wild turkeys on shooting preserves. Bailey discusses the reasons for this decision.
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Record #:
9458
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North Carolina's wild turkey population, currently at 5,000, is the lowest among the Southeastern states. This number exists only because the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission began a project in 1971 to restore the turkey to its old habitats. Waldorf discusses the progress made on this project and what needs to be done to stop habitat destruction.
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Record #:
9845
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By the start of the 20th-century, wild turkeys were almost eliminated from North Carolina's forests and woodlands. However, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's restoration program has been very successful, and the turkey population is climbing.
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