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45 results for Amundson, Rod
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Record #:
6596
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Amundson describes the characteristics, breeding and food habits, and economic value of North Carolina's non-poisonous snakes. These include the common king snake, pine snake, garter snake, green snake, hog-nosed snake, blacksnake, and water snakes.
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Record #:
6607
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Although the American woodcock is known by at least thirty names, including big-eyed John, bogsucker, and timberdoodle, it remains one of the least known and understood game birds. To a small number of North Carolina hunters, it is one of the most popular game-birds. Amundson discusses the woodcock's history, description, general characteristics, food and breeding habits, management, and natural enemies.
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Record #:
6603
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In North Carolina, turtles range from the small box turtle, measuring five or six inches long, to the giant leatherback that measures eight feet long and weighs more than half a ton. Amundson describes some of these turtles, including the common musk, common mud, snapping, soft shell, and box turtle.
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Record #:
6605
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The ruffed grouse, a distinctly American bird, is one of the most important game birds of North Carolina. Amundson describes the bird's characteristics, food habits, mating habits, nesting, enemies, management, and game-bird qualities.
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Record #:
9072
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This is the fourth in a series describing the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's game lands. These are areas open to hunting by the public during the regular season. A special games land permit is required to hunt on these managed lands. The Western Game Lands, at 655,298 acres, is one of the smaller of the state's four game lands. This area includes the Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests, Caney Fork, Green River, and Toxaway Lands, plus several tracts owned by Champion International Corporation.
Record #:
9353
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Amundson examines wildlife management of the bobwhite quail.
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Record #:
9434
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Amundson discusses the history, description, behavior, breeding habits, enemies, and management of North Carolina's state mammal, the gray squirrel.
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Record #:
11356
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Amundson discusses how conservation efforts at the Weldon Hatchery are assisting in the preservation of striped bass, or rockfish, in the Roanoke River. The hatchery is the world's first and oldest striped bass hatchery.
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Record #:
13281
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Schools of porpoises like to hang around the North Carolina coast. These fascinating creatures, with a confusion of common names, are common sights alongside fishing boats in North Carolina's sounds and along her coasts.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 8, July 1953, p3-4, 13, f
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Record #:
13796
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In Mount Airy, they discovered that fishing is a way to rehabilitate juvenile delinquents.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 49, May 1952, p3-4, f
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Record #:
13831
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A new fence has been built to keep saltwater out of the Currituck Sound. The saltwater has been negatively affecting bass.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 32, Jan 1953, p5-6, il
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Record #:
6617
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Because of the superior quality of their fur, otters were almost trapped into extinction across the country. It wasn't many years ago that otters were extremely rare in North Carolina. Now, protected by strict game laws, the Carolina otter is sufficiently numerous again in the eastern part of the state to warrant an open season for trapping. Amundson discusses the otter's range, characteristics, food and breeding habits, management, general behavior, and having them as pets.
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Record #:
6619
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Although there are three species of weasels in North Carolina, the Alleghenian least weasel, the New York weasel, and the Southern weasel, the animal is scarce in the state. Many people consider this a blessing because the weasel is one of the most bloodthirsty predators in North America. Amundson describes the weasel's characteristics, food habits, mating, enemies, and economic value.
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Record #:
6609
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North Carolina has two types of crows: the common eastern crow, which ranges from the coastal plains through the mountains, and the fish crow, a larger species, which is confined to the coastal regions. Amundson discusses the eastern crow-–its characteristics, having it as a pet, food and breeding habits, enemies, migration patterns, and control.
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Record #:
6591
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In this WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA series about wildlife species in the state, Amundson describes puddle ducks, so named because \"they habitually feed in shallow water by dabbling and tipping up their tails with their heads submerged so that only the posterior shows above the water.\" A large number either visit or reside in North Carolina, including the shoveler, gadwall, and baldpate. Amundson discusses the puddle duck's history, characteristics, range and distribution, breeding and food habits, and management.
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