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10 results for Turtles
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Record #:
6603
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In North Carolina, turtles range from the small box turtle, measuring five or six inches long, to the giant leatherback that measures eight feet long and weighs more than half a ton. Amundson describes some of these turtles, including the common musk, common mud, snapping, soft shell, and box turtle.
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Record #:
6715
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A Fishery Resource Grant project to track turtles in the Pamlico Sound is also providing data for a marine life census that stretches around the world. The Pamlico project is designed to determine movements of loggerheads and other turtles in an effort to reduce the number of turtles caught in flounder gill nets. Using a single satellite, the project tracked forty-five turtles, making it one of the world's largest turtle-tracking studies. Mosher gives an update of the project.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Early Summer 2004, p23-25, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
9397
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Turtles are found throughout most of eastern North Carolina, inhabiting shallow inlets, ponds, and quiet coves. These freshwater dwellers include the spotted turtle, red-bellied turtle, eastern mud turtle, box turtle, and softshell turtle.
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Record #:
13858
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Ugly and ill-tempered, snapping turtles are not the most pleasant members of turtle society, yet they are an important part of aquatic communities.
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Record #:
14157
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According to the \"Ford Times,\" in Washington, there is a two-headed Terrapin named Super Diamond. He was born on a government turtle farm in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 27, Dec 1949, p8, f
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Record #:
5309
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There are twenty-one species of turtles living in North Carolina. All but three of them live in the coastal counties and include the loggerhead, leatherback, hawksbill, Kemp's ridley, and green turtle.
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Record #:
28305
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A comparative ecology study of turtles inhabiting five golf courses and five farm ponds was conducted in the western Piedmont of North Carolina. Results indicate that both farm and golf course ponds can provide habitat for semi-aquatic turtles, and that the surrounding landscape can influence species abundances.
Record #:
28266
Abstract:
Necropsy of two wild-caught bog turtles, Glyptemys muhlenbergii, found dead in 1982 and 1995 under similar conditions in North Carolina and Virginia revealed large numbers of bacteria in the lungs. This suggested bacterial pneumonia as the primary cause of death.
Record #:
30027
Abstract:
The Gulf Coast spiny softshell turtle (Apalone spinifera) is a wide-ranging species found throughout North Carolina and other states along the Atlantic Ocean. The first record of this species in Norfolk, Virginia was observed in 1991. The Virginia population may be related to the population based in Harnett County, North Carolina.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p99-102, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30047
Abstract:
Cooter and redbelly turtles are aquatic species that inhabit the southeastern United States. Taxonomic relationships in the genus Pseudemys have been unclear due to an extensive history of species-subspecies revisions. This study analyzed and compared morphological characteristics of various turtle species in North Carolina and Virginia drainage systems.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p105-135, il, map Periodical Website
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