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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Frogs
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Record #:
23981
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The author discusses various animals that help foster the success of gardens, in particular frogs and toads.
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Record #:
25289
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Carolyn Smith gives the details on the chorus tree frog including its mating rituals, its growth, and a general description of the amphibian.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p6, il
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Record #:
6593
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Frogs and toads are neither fish nor game; yet they provide sport, food for the table, and assistance to farmers through their large appetite for insects. Amundson discusses the life history of these creatures, food habits, hibernation, and enemies.
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Record #:
9017
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Frogs and toads make up a group of animals which lie between fish and reptiles in the biological classification of the animal kingdom. Amundson describes their life history, food habits, hibernation, enemies, and being creatures as food and sport.
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Record #:
9043
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Frog legs are considered a delicacy among some individuals. Chauncey describes the equipment needed to hunt them, where to start searching for frogs, hunting at night, and how to prepare the meal.
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Record #:
9792
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Arrington discusses finding and photographing frogs in a marsh at night and the type of photographic equipment to use.
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Record #:
7515
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Beane discusses North Carolina's second-largest frog, the river frog (Rana heckscheri). This frog is among the most poorly known in the Southeast. Albert H. Wright described it first in 1924. These frogs range from southern Mississippi to southeastern North Carolina, where the Lumber and Cape Fear River systems provided habitats. They were readily found in these river areas between 1965 and 1975. The last known river frog in the state was collected on July 12, 1975.
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Record #:
8852
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Beane discusses the gopher frog, a creature that few North Carolinians have ever heard of, let alone seen. There are three species in the South--the Florida gopher frog, the dusky gopher frog of the Gulf Coast, and the Carolina gopher frog. The Carolina frog has symmetrically arranged warts that give a cobblestone texture to its skin. All three species enter the water only to breed; otherwise, they spend the rest of their lives deep in burrows. As with many other species, destruction of ponds and habitats is making the gopher frog extremely rare in its normal range.
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Record #:
35721
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Throughout folklore, frogs are often associated with rain and one particular family that now lives in Columbus, Ohio, believe that frogs come to the earth via rain.
Record #:
36166
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Shelter often entails providing for the basic needs of life, and shoreline creatures are no exception. Among life calling lakes and ponds at and below the surface home were the duck potato and duckweek, the great blue heron and leopard frog.