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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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50 results for Gardens and gardening
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Record #:
21848
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Anderson describes how to add silver to the garden using plants, including Jack Frost, White Nancy, Margery Fish, and White Dusty Miller.
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Record #:
23982
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Finley Park, an upscale North Wilkesboro neighborhood, is home to a beautiful botanical garden owned by Debbie and Harry Ferguson. Debbie serves on the North Wilkesboro Board of Commissioners.
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Record #:
23980
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Donna Edgell, a teacher in Mebane, North Carolina, discusses how she successfully ties teaching and gardening together on her property.
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Record #:
23981
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The author discusses various animals that help foster the success of gardens, in particular frogs and toads.
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Record #:
23984
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The author present easy-to-grow herbs and highlights their best uses in the kitchen and for health. Some herbs include lavender, lemon balm, marjoram, and yarrow.
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Record #:
23983
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The author presents various microorganisms found in soil that help nurture plants and how to keep soil full of microorganisms all year round.
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Record #:
28539
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The Wild Senna is a plant with a rich history. The plant was used by Native Americans for external skin problems and to treat fevers. It is also used as a laxative and was popular in 19th-century gardens. How to grow the plant, the beneficial pollinators and birds it attracts, and its natural history are explored.
Record #:
29580
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In the hills outside Asheville, North Carolina, Bob and Judy McLean cultivate six thousand dahlia flowers covering three acres of what they call, Poppins Posies. Originally cultivated by the Aztecs, dahlias are perennial mountain flowers that survive until frost. The McLeans have grown hybrids of dahlias and their garden is now a small family business.
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Record #:
29682
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Hunter Stubbs is a landscape designer and partner at B.B. Barns Landscape Company in Asheville, North Carolina. In early fall, Stubbs tells gardeners to prepare the garden beds for winter and lay the foundation for the next growing season. Stubbs advises to take seasonal photos, save seeds, protect fragile plants, plant bulbs, apply compost, and bring plants inside.
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Record #:
29854
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Thousands of plant species exist in Western North Carolina, and it can become difficult for gardeners to remember all the plant names. Garden designer Nancy Duffy created a smart phone and computer application that gives gardeners the ability to tag plants and keep organized digital records for their garden. The Muddy Boots Plant Tags are also being used in a series of garden tours hosted by Bullington Gardens of Hendersonville.
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Record #:
29885
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Asheville Hydroponics and Organics is a garden shop that specializes in growing vegetables, fruits and non-edibles without soil. Co-owners Andrew Morris and Evan Godlesky also collaborate with community programs teaching locals about hydroponic and organic gardens.
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Record #:
30619
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The Japanese painted fern is a dependable perennial plant that can grow well in North Carolina summers and survive winter conditions. The plant is rated for USDA Zones three through eight, is deer-resistant, and prefers partial to fully shaded spots. This article provides tips on growing the fern in gardens.
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Record #:
30620
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North Carolina typically ranks sixth or seventh among all blueberry-producing states. Ideal locations to grow blueberries are in Bladen and surrounding counties. Experts from North Carolina State University provide tips on how to grow and care for blueberries.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Mar 2016, p14-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30646
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Spring in North Carolina is an ideal time for gardeners to attract butterflies. This can be done by planting native flowering, nectar-producing plants that attract mature butterflies, and plant foliage that attract young caterpillars. This article provides a guide to gardening, native plants and species of butterflies.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 3, Mar 2014, p22-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30848
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The North Carolina Botanical Garden chose Piedmont Barbara’s Buttons (Marshallia obovata var. obovata) as Wildflower of the Year for 2009. Other award-winning melons, squash, and perennials are also described in this article, as well as tips on native plant gardening.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 3, Mar 2009, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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