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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Otters
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Record #:
2659
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Abstract:
Between 1989 and 1995, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission transplanted otters to the state's western waterways. For the first time since the 1930s, otters are living again in eleven of the state's western watersheds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 8, Jan 1996, p4-5, il
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Record #:
7342
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River otters are known for their antics, whether performing in the wild or in an aquarium. This animal can grow to around three or four feet and weigh more than forty pounds. It can live up to fifteen years in the wild and sometimes longer in captivity. However, back in the 1800s and early 1900s, the river otter had all but vanished from the North Carolina landscape. Uncontrolled trapping, water pollution, and habitat destruction contributed to its demise. In the 1970s the state began an otter reintroduction program. Today the otter has been successfully restored throughout the state.
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Record #:
6617
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Because of the superior quality of their fur, otters were almost trapped into extinction across the country. It wasn't many years ago that otters were extremely rare in North Carolina. Now, protected by strict game laws, the Carolina otter is sufficiently numerous again in the eastern part of the state to warrant an open season for trapping. Amundson discusses the otter's range, characteristics, food and breeding habits, management, general behavior, and having them as pets.
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Record #:
6677
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The otter is a sleek, elongated package of muscular energy with brains and playful disposition. Once facing the threat of extinction in the state, the otter has made a comeback and today produces valuable pelts. About 95 percent of the existing otter population is found in the coastal area of North Carolina, with the remainder scattered through the Piedmont counties in the Yadkin River watershed.
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Record #:
2384
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission completed its river otter restoration project in the spring of 1995. For the first time since the 1930s, river otters, moved from eastern counties, are again in eleven of the state's western watersheds.
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Record #:
26868
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Abstract:
River otters, one of the largest members of the weasel family, are found throughout most of North Carolina. Although popular information on otters is abundant, there are very few scientific facts about their biology, population status, and ecology. Biologists at North Carolina State University are studying the otters to inform management.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 12, Dec 1981, p3, il
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Record #:
37818
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Abstract:
The Carolina otter is described including its history, characteristics, breeding and eating habits, behavior, and more.
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