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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Wildlife introduction
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Record #:
13945
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Abstract:
In the late 19th century, fish were declining in North Carolina's rivers and streams. In attempting to provide food for the people, some of whom were still dealing with the effects of Reconstruction, the state's first fish commission (1877-1885) embarked on a plan of restocking, species introduction, and artificial propagation. Wilson discusses the results of their efforts.
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Record #:
13946
Author(s):
Abstract:
The goal of North Carolina's first fish commission was to provide more fish for the state's people. The commission embarked on a program of stocking native fish and to introduce other species that would survive and increase. Rainbow trout and carp were two of the most successful introductions.
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Record #:
9795
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carp were introduced in the country in 1831, primarily as a food fish. A great stocking program followed that reached its heyday in the 1880s, when 260,000 carp were distributed in 298 of the 301 United States Congressional Districts. Davies discusses how to fish for carp and why this fish has fallen into disfavor.
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Record #:
16908
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time spotted bass were probably native to some stretches of rivers in the western part of the state; however, current populations have been introduced either by wildlife agency stocking programs of the 1970s, or more recently by fishermen. While anglers enjoy the fish's scrappiness, its introduction could have a negative impact on other bass. Ingram examines the state's four geographic reasons to see how spots are affecting other bass populations like large and smallmouth.
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