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16 results for Ingram, Bruce
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Record #:
20291
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Although ticks and mosquitoes are sometimes overlooked as a danger by people who love the outdoors, they are health threats that can cause skin irritations and diseases like Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Lyme. Brown Dog, Lone Star American Dog, and Black-Legged are the state's resident ticks.
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22394
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Wildlife biologist Evan Stanford of the NC Wildlife Resources Commission explains why taking a doe early in the season rather than much later can benefit both the hunter and the deer herd.
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23947
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Author Bruce Ingram discusses his locavore lifestyle, an emerging trend. The locavore lifestyle involves growing chemical-free food, hunting, fishing, raising livestock, and using natural energy like firewood and solar power instead of electricity. He urges North Carolinians to consider the lifestyle, or at least utilize local farmer's markets for fresh produce.
Record #:
8798
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Hunting turkeys in North Carolina's mountains offers new challenges to flat-land hunters. Ingram discusses points to consider, including gaining access to hunting grounds; type of land features to look for; hunting in the big woods; and calling tactics.
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Record #:
9013
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Canoe enthusiasts can find many places in the state to dip a paddle; eastern North Carolina alone provides 1,200 miles of navigable waters. Canoeing, like many hobbies, can be expensive. Ingram describes eleven must-have items for around $200 for the frugal paddler.
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Record #:
10241
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People who fish have a large supply of lures in their tackle boxes, but they usually find one that proves highly effective when bass fishing. Ingram lists four flies and five artificial lures that are definite bass catchers.
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Record #:
11034
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Not everyone has an opportunity to begin hunting turkeys at an early period in their life. For those who take up the sport in later life, Ingram offers some hunting suggestions.
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Record #:
12100
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Casting for Recovery (CFR) is a program that uses fly-fishing as a tool to help women who have or have had breast cancer to get better physically and mentally. The program began in 1996 and offers forty-four retreats in thirty states.
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Record #:
19278
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Winding through Virginia and North Carolina, the Dan River has many unique qualities, but it also faces many similar conservation issues throughout its long trek such as water quality and riparian damage.
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Record #:
19267
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The Uwharrie River which winds through the Piedmont in Uwharrie National Forest, is becoming popular for its enticing fishing, especially bass.
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Record #:
12504
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Part 1 of this two-part series on the Dan River discussed the stream from its Virginia headwaters along the Blue Ridge Parkway to Hanging Rock State Park in Stokes County. Part 2 follows the river from the park to Kerr Lake.
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Record #:
16908
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At one time spotted bass were probably native to some stretches of rivers in the western part of the state; however, current populations have been introduced either by wildlife agency stocking programs of the 1970s, or more recently by fishermen. While anglers enjoy the fish's scrappiness, its introduction could have a negative impact on other bass. Ingram examines the state's four geographic reasons to see how spots are affecting other bass populations like large and smallmouth.
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Record #:
16678
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Anthony Hipps of Lexington discusses why fly-fishermen should fly-tie their own lures. He describes the material he uses to make his poppers and how to tie them, then demonstrates how to use them while fishing.
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Record #:
28570
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With the projects described, land owners can welcome more wildlife onto their property. Some easy projects to help welcome wildlife include creating a mini food plot, creating brush piles, cutting standing softwoods, creating an early successional area, girdling non-masting trees, and leaving standing den trees. The importance of planning, directions how to complete each project, and which types of wildlife will be attracted by these projects are all detailed.
Record #:
29613
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When North Carolina’s archery season begins in September, a key factor for bow hunters’ success is deducing what local whitetail deer will be eating. Deer in northeastern North Carolina have a reputation for growing large due to the abundance of crops. Understanding what kind of food deer eat can help hunters determine hunting positions.