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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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51 results for Wilson, Jim
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Record #:
7122
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In 1965, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission surveys indicated a quail harvest by hunters of almost three million birds. By 2002, the number had dropped to around two hundred thousand. The primary cause of the decline is that the birds no longer have the habitat they require. Increasing population demands more land for businesses and homes. Farmers became more efficient with their land and planted crops that didn't benefit quail as corn, wheat, and soybeans had. Fires, which once benefited quail habitats, are now more controlled in the forests. Wilson discuss this decline and what, if anything, can be done to restore the quail population.
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Record #:
7495
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At the beginning of the 20th century, vast flocks of Canada geese wintered in North Carolina. With numbers reaching over 100,000, Lake Mattamuskeet was called the Canada goose capital of the world. In the last century, the number of migrating geese has dwindled to around 5,000 while the resident population has multiplied to over one million. Resident Canada geese are found in all one hundred counties. Migratory birds winter in northeastern North Carolina. Stable breeding habitats, few predators, and short distances to migrate contribute to the resident's population growth. Wilson presents an account of North Carolina's Canada geese from the 16th century to the present.
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Record #:
7754
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The side-by-side barreled shotgun was the gun of choice for most bird hunters in the 19th and early 20th centuries. While the over-and-under barreled shotgun became more popular in the 20th century, the side-by-side continued to hold a special place among wing shooters. Wilson feels this continued use is caused by a combination of nostalgia, the beauty feel of the gun, and a certain grace this gun possesses that no other gun can match. He discusses the Vintagers, also known as the Order of Edwardian Gunners, which formed in 1994. This group not only appreciates the double-barreled gun, but many members like to dress in clothing of the Edwardian era (1895-1914), when they are in the field.
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Record #:
8139
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Beginning on January 1, 2007, most anglers who fish in coastal and ocean waters of the state must have a new Coastal Recreational Fishing License. Previously, North Carolina was the last state in the Southeast without a recreational saltwater license. Saltwater fishing is big business in the state with over a million people fishing each year. The new license will aid the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries in collecting crucial data to help the agency better manage fish stocks.
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Record #:
8234
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Commercial fishermen in the state face an increasingly difficult life. They deal with intense state and federal regulations, while facing stiff competition from foreign imports. Fish houses are disappearing, leaving fewer places to sell catches. Boats slips are losing out to developments. A new factor is the tension that exists between commercial fisherman and recreational anglers. Wilson discusses reasons for this tension and what can be done about it.
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Record #:
8341
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For over fifty years, wildlife photographers Jack Dermid and Gene Hester have traveled across North Carolina in search of photographic opportunities. Dermid has a reputation for extraordinary patience in getting exactly the right shot, and Hester travels widely each year in search of waterfowl and deer. Wilson discusses the careers of these two well-known photographers.
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Record #:
10150
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Wilson discusses catch-and-release fishing in North Carolina. The program came to the state in 1954 on trout streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The program is an approach to having more fish available to catch and emphasizes the recreational rather than the consumptive value of fish.
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Record #:
12098
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The rivers and streams in the mountains of North Carolina are well-stocked with trout and attract fishermen from all parts of the state and country. A recent study conducted in 2008 by Responsive Management and Southwick Associates indicates the state derives a significant economic benefit from these angling activities.
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Record #:
13945
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In the late 19th century, fish were declining in North Carolina's rivers and streams. In attempting to provide food for the people, some of whom were still dealing with the effects of Reconstruction, the state's first fish commission (1877-1885) embarked on a plan of restocking, species introduction, and artificial propagation. Wilson discusses the results of their efforts.
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13946
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The goal of North Carolina's first fish commission was to provide more fish for the state's people. The commission embarked on a program of stocking native fish and to introduce other species that would survive and increase. Rainbow trout and carp were two of the most successful introductions.
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Record #:
14092
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In part three of a three-part series, Wilson recounts the rise of the modern fish hatchery system in North Carolina. The state has a long history of artificial fish propagation dating back to 1877. The modern period began in 1925 when the North Carolina General Assembly appropriated $500,000 to build five new hatcheries around the state.
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Record #:
19274
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Boaters in North Carolina now have easier access to state waters given the productivity of N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's Division of Engineering Services. The group has been renovating, replacing, and building Boating Access Areas (BAA) from the mountains to the coast.
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19270
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Although a time-consuming recipe, Brunswick Stew has become a staple and cultural icon of eastern North Carolina. Recipe included.
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Record #:
22359
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Wilson pays tribute to Jack Dermid, a famous wildlife photographer whose works appeared many times in Wildlife in North Carolina and other publications
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23071
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Experienced fly fisherman, Jim Wilson, discusses the history of fly-fishing for bass in North Carolina. He then offers details about fly-fishing at Phelps Lake in Washington and Tyrrell counties, the second largest natural lake in North Carolina.
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