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15 results for Fisheries--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
986
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Talking with federal and state fisheries managers, policymakers, and representatives from commercial fishing organizations, the author outlines the problems and complexities facing today's commercial fishing industry in North Carolina.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1993, p2-7, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1402
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Due to a new North Carolina Fisheries regulation, fishery agents and fishermen are working to reduce bycatch -- the amount of non-targeted catch -- fishermen net along with their intended catch. Various bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) are being tested.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1993, p19, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2321
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Frustrated over regulation by state and federal agencies of the commercial fishing industry, wives, mothers, sisters, and sweethearts have formed advocacy groups that have become an effective, unified political voice for the state's watermen.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1995, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2746
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In 1919, shark fishing for profit began in the state. Products included tanned shark hide and fertilizer. When shark meat became popular in 1983, however, fishery regulation was needed to protect the species.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1996, p11-12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6712
Author(s):
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Green discusses the new federal permit that is required for private recreational fishing boats that target highly migratory species, or HMS. The regulations cover species including sharks, tunas, swordfishes, and billfishes. The permits are required for anglers doing catch-and-release fishing or landing the fish.
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Record #:
6893
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Will Morgan, executive director of the North Carolina chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association, worked with the North Carolina General Assembly to help pass legislation creating a saltwater fishing license. The issue, which had been debated for over a decade, passed in 2004. North Carolina was the only state between Texas and Delaware that did not have this license. The license is a user fee and costs $15 annually or $1 for a seven-day permit. Fees will be used for marine projects and scholarships for students pursuing marine science degrees.
Record #:
8139
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beginning on January 1, 2007, most anglers who fish in coastal and ocean waters of the state must have a new Coastal Recreational Fishing License. Previously, North Carolina was the last state in the Southeast without a recreational saltwater license. Saltwater fishing is big business in the state with over a million people fishing each year. The new license will aid the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries in collecting crucial data to help the agency better manage fish stocks.
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Record #:
8374
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Luetze discusses the decline in fish stocks worldwide. Almost a third of the fish stocks, as revealed in a four-year study of catch records, were 90 percent below the maximum historical catch level. Predictions are that by the mid-2000s the stocks will be practically nonexistent, affecting two hundred million people who fish for a living and one billion people who depend on fish as their primary food. He discusses the importance of renewing the Magnuson-Stevens Act of 1976, which established fishery councils to manage resources and fishing activities in the federal two-hundred-mile limit off the national coastline. Only in North Carolina's Southeastern Atlantic region has there been any progress is protecting and rebuilding fish stocks.
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Record #:
17882
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During the 1965 session of the General Assembly, several changes were made to legislative affecting boating, commercial fisheries, and wildlife management agencies. Changing the Omnibus Revision of the Fish Law constituted the biggest portion of legislative decisions, which reorganized and redistributed the Division of Commercial Fisheries of the Department of Conservation and Development. New rules regarding boat safety were also passed.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 32 Issue 4, Dec 1965, p16-19, 22
Record #:
26520
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The Dingell-Johnson Act is celebrating 30 years of success. The Act, which levied a ten percent tax on certain fishing equipment, has generated over $3,000,000 annually into sport fisheries.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 10, Oct 1980, p10
Record #:
26686
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission set major regulation changes for striped bass, gear, and shellfish. The provisions specify number of days in the season, areas, means and methods, quantity caught and size requirements.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1985, p5
Record #:
3231
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Before the delayed-harvest trout fishing regulations went into effect in 1992, trout streams often were exhausted after the season opened. Now trout can be fished from October 1 until the first Saturday in June as long as they are released.
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Record #:
6890
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The 2004 North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation creating a saltwater fishing license. The issue had been debated for over a decade. Fishermen will not be required to have the license until January 1, 2006. Then residents and nonresidents who fish from the shore or a boat in the state's marine waters will be required to purchase the $15 license annually. Vacationers may purchase a seven-day license for $1.
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Record #:
30931
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Four newly funded projects cover a host of coastal topics for various community-based collaborations. Projects range from studying marsh changes in the Currituck Sound, supplying cape shark to schools for lunch, educating about restored estuarine habitats, and an oral history of the 1997 Fisheries Reform Act.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2016, p14-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35425
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What made summers in years past special for this quintet of authors? Sometimes, it was activities like hand gliding happening during holidays, such as the Fourth of July. Other times, activities such as crabbing and camping happened on ordinary days made extraordinary by the people, place, or provisions taking part in the recalled memory.
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