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20 results for Bird populations
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Record #:
4148
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The Avid Quail Hunting Survey, conducted during the 1997-98 game bird hunting seasons, documents a decline in quail, grouse, and woodcock populations. Land-use practices that disturb habitats and aging forests both are contributing factors.
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Record #:
7122
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In 1965, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission surveys indicated a quail harvest by hunters of almost three million birds. By 2002, the number had dropped to around two hundred thousand. The primary cause of the decline is that the birds no longer have the habitat they require. Increasing population demands more land for businesses and homes. Farmers became more efficient with their land and planted crops that didn't benefit quail as corn, wheat, and soybeans had. Fires, which once benefited quail habitats, are now more controlled in the forests. Wilson discuss this decline and what, if anything, can be done to restore the quail population.
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Record #:
11120
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Newman describes how wildlife biologists locate and document breeding colonies of wading birds through the use of airplanes.
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Record #:
16437
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One of the state's noblest traditions--quail hunting--is in danger of extinction. Prior to the 1970s, more than 175,000 hunters came to the state and harvested between 2.2 and 2.8 million quail. During the 1995 season only 28,000 hunters harvested 225,000 quail. Jones discusses reasons for the decline and whether it can be reversed. In the state quail are declining at 6.2 percent per year from 1982 to 1991.
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Record #:
16455
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There has been a decline in quail and seventeen other bird species associated with farming and weedy, grassy, brushy habitats in North Carolina and other Southeastern states. Bromley, Bill Palmer, and Marc Puckett investigated whether pesticides and drainage ditch management were possible causes. Results are reported. Also included is a set of nine questions, which the author says will be a large, complex research project seeking to account for the decline, and which he hopes will be answered by the end of the century.
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Record #:
16456
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The American woodcock is one of the most widespread game birds in North America. Although it is known by at least thirty names, including big-eyed John, bogsucker, and timberdoodle, it remains one of the least known and understood game birds. The article provides information on the woodcock, such as its appearance and behaviors, and stresses the importance of habitat maintenance to insure its stability.
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Record #:
16548
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Evans with the Southern Appalachian Chapter of the Ruffed Grouse Society and Ashburn of North Carolina Quail Unlimited discuss recent accomplishments in improving conditions for upland game birds and future directions of their respective organizations.
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Record #:
16609
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This article is written from the assumption that predators--opossum, fox, raccoon, and skunk--are having a negative effect on quail populations and examines what can be done by trappers and hunters to increase the number of predators harvested.
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Record #:
24438
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Bird watching is making a comeback on the shores of the Outer Banks. About 400 varieties of birds have been documented on the Outer Banks, and the Audubon Society’s Pine Island Wildlife Sanctuary is home to many of them.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 12, May 1993, p24-26, il
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Record #:
9807
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Before the 1970s, quail were abundant in the Southeast, but the population has rapidly declined since then. A major study seeks to answer why this has happened. Changing land use, predation, natural fluctuations, and control by man of naturally occurring fires are seen as contributing factors in the decline.
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Record #:
1382
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Each June, North Carolina volunteers listen for bird calls to help chart long-term bird population trends.
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Record #:
3594
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With populations of a number of songbirds in decline, state biologists are participating in the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) Program. Demographic data will help explain the decline as well as provide data on conserving birds.
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Record #:
4585
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Many of the state's migratory songbirds that summer here and winter in Latin America are declining in numbers. Loss of tropical forests is one factor. Another is the change in the way coffee is grown. With the loss of forests over the last two decades, many birds moved into shaded coffee plantations where coffee plants are grown beneath the trees. Now many farmers are growing high-yield coffee varieties that need sunlight. Almost half of northern Latin America's coffee plantations have converted from shade to sun as of 1990, further reducing songbird habitats.
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Record #:
5217
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Loss of habitats threatens bird populations worldwide. In the 1980s, Birdlife International began a program to identify and protect important bird areas in Europe. The program reached the United States in 1995, and North Carolina launched its program in 1998. To date nearly 90 Important Bird Areas (IBAs) have been designated across the state. Though no legal protection is granted by IBA recognition, still it is a blueprint for wildlife conservation.
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Record #:
5173
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North Carolina's quail population is declining. A study conducted at North Carolina State University put to rest some long-held assumptions and pinpointed a main cause. Pesticides and predators were proven to be less of a direct cause than had been thought, with loss of habitat being the chief reason for the decline.
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