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13 results for Sorenson, Clyde
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Record #:
7360
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Over three thousand species of mosquitoes inhabit the earth. North Carolina's mild, humid climate and abundant wetlands provide fertile breeding grounds for these insects. Around sixty species inhabit the state, but only forty of them bite humans and animals, and of that number, twelve can cause serious problems. Some of the most troublesome ones have been introduced into the state from other parts of the world.
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Record #:
5325
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Monarch butterflies begin their migration to Mexico from southern Canada and the eastern United States in late August. Many of the 100 million travelers will cover 3,000 miles at speeds of 10 mph. In mid-September the monarchs pass through North Carolina. The best areas to view them are along the beaches and gaps along the Blue Ridge Parkway and other mountain roads.
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Record #:
5724
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North Carolina has a native scorpion, Vaejovis carolinianus, a small, rather innocuous creature. Two other species, one from the Great Plains and the other native to Florida, have been accidentally introduced into the state. Sorenson discusses their possible impact on the environment.
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Record #:
7900
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Ticks are common parasites that are found all across the state. There are around 800 to 900 species of ticks in the world, but only a few live in North Carolina. The American dog tick is the state's largest in size. The black-legged tick and lone star tick are also found here. They are health threats that can cause skin irritations and diseases like Rocky Mountain spotted fever and lyme disease. Sorenson suggests ways of dealing with ticks during the summer season, such as recognizing a tick habitat and dressing for tick when outside.
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Record #:
10240
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A big challenge in bird conservation is determining how many birds in a given species exist and whether that population is increasing or decreasing. Sorenson discusses the Bird Radio System, developed by Ted Simons, a North Carolina State University ornithologist, to help with this challenge.
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Record #:
10302
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Populations of honeybees are declining across the country, but North Carolina still has a good complement of native bee pollinators.
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Record #:
10551
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The coastal plain of North and South Carolina is the primary wintering range for woodcocks in the Eastern Flyway. This bird has a long bill which is ideal for probing in the dirt for food, and its mottled brown color provides a good camouflage against predators. The woodcock's preference for dense cover habitats makes it a challenging bird to hunt.
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Record #:
12970
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Sorenson explains the process which moves barrier islands from east to west.
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Record #:
13942
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Periodical cicadas bring a deafening noise to North Carolina this month. It is an event that happens only once every thirteen years. This type of cicada is found in eastern North American and nowhere else in the world. There are seven species - four with a thirteen-year cycle, found mostly in the south, and three with a seventeen-year cycle and found more in the north. This brood will appear in the Piedmont and mountain sections of the state.
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Record #:
13864
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Sorensen discusses mistakes turkey hunters should avoid in order to ensure a successful hunt.
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Record #:
17756
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Sorenson discusses where American Shad, one of North Carolina's most valuable commercial and recreational fish species, spawns, travels, and is caught.
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Record #:
20831
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Sorenson explains how the aggressive mantis shrimp can strike so swiftly when hunting prey.
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Record #:
29620
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A wide variety of colors can be found among salamander species in North Carolina. While the hues some salamanders display may be related to species recognition, the colors and patterns of most species have a great deal to do with how they cope with predators. Color can be used as camouflage, mimicry, or a warning.