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9 results for Salamanders
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Record #:
6729
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Salamanders are populous all across the state. These creatures belong to the order Caudata, comprised of seven families in North America, and all found in North Carolina. Adams describes a number of them, including the two-toed amphiuma which, at four feet, is the state's largest salamander and one of the largest in the world.
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Record #:
21027
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There are 58 different species of salamanders found in the state--the densest concentration anywhere in the world. Schulte describes the marbled salamander, which has a unique reproductive custom--it lays its eggs out of water.
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Record #:
26384
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In a recent expedition to the upper reaches of the Trent River, NCWRC biologists located a threatened species, the waterdog, or mudpuppy. This salamander was found where it was previously unseen, believed to be congregating for breeding.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 1, Winter 1979, p30
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Record #:
6975
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The Eastern tiger salamander is North Carolina's largest terrestrial salamander. Although it may grow to a foot in length, the salamander is such a secretive creature that few people have ever seen one. Most of the state's tiger salamanders are confined to the Sandhills region. This salamander is on North Carolina's endangered species list.
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Record #:
16680
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North Carolina is known for its salamander diversity; however one stands out from the rest and that is the Eastern hellbender. It inhabits clean, cold rivers and larger streams, and in the state they are found in the western mountain rivers. They can measure up to two feet and have a brown mottled coloration.
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Record #:
29614
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The green salamander is North Carolina’s only endangered amphibian, and occurs in small populations in a few of the state’s southwestern mountain counties. In the past twelve years, most green salamander discoveries can be credited to Alan Cameron, a retiree and volunteer for Wildlife Diversity. Cameron has discovered new salamander sites, observed unreported behaviors and rare pigmentation patterns.
Record #:
29620
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A wide variety of colors can be found among salamander species in North Carolina. While the hues some salamanders display may be related to species recognition, the colors and patterns of most species have a great deal to do with how they cope with predators. Color can be used as camouflage, mimicry, or a warning.
Record #:
29834
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The Southern Appalachians is home to more than sixty species of salamanders in North Carolina. The salamander fauna is so diverse because as the Appalachian Mountains formed and evolved, the salamanders adapted to profound geologic and climatological changes. Many species are in serious decline due to diseases and water pollution.
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Record #:
30085
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A new species of woodland salamander, Plethodon aureoles, occurs between the Little Tennessee and Hiwassee rivers on the western slopes of the Unicoi Mountains and nearby lowlands in southeastern Tennessee and adjacent North Carolina. It is a member of the Plethodon glutinosus group of salamanders in the southern Appalachian Mountains.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 9, June 1983, p1-20, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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