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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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29 results for Birds, Protection of
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Record #:
1224
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North Carolina is playing a crucial role in a new international program, Partners in Flight, which is trying to save dwindling bird species.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Sept/Oct 1993, p4-6, 15, il
Record #:
2834
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In the late 1800s and early 1900s, demands by hat makers for plumage and restaurants for bird meat brought near extinction to coastal flocks. Efforts by T. Gilbert Pearson and others led to conservation laws that restored the birds by World War II.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1996, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4849
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Migratory birds face a number of dangers, both natural and manmade. One adversity coastal fishermen report is bird entanglement in fishing nets. A project funded by a North Carolina Fisheries Resource Grant is investigating whether submerged nets will catch fewer birds than floating ones.
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Record #:
7224
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North Carolina has twenty-five species of nesting colonial water birds. Many, including herons, egrets, ibises, pelicans, skimmers, gulls, and terns, breed on the state's barrier islands and nearby ocean fronts. Some colonies are faring well; others face an uncertain future. Competition with people for prime beach real estate affects the flocks' habitats. Surveys of the birds' nestings began in 1976-1977. Cameron discusses how several of the species are surviving.
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Record #:
7566
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Cape Hatteras National Seashore naturalist Clay Gifford discusses the effect of litter on wildlife. Many people who litter along the beaches or in natural areas often do not realize the harm they are creating for wildlife. Among the items Gifford considers a menace to wildlife are monofilament fishing line, plastic six-pack bottle holders, paper from Polaroid films, and cans. Birds can be ensnared, strangled, or poisoned by these items.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p36-37, il
Record #:
8245
Abstract:
Mike and Ali Lubbock founded the Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Center in Scotland Neck in Halifax County in 1989. Covering about nine acres, the center boasts the largest collection of waterfowl in the world and is a conservation and research orientated center for birds, especially rare and endangered waterfowl. Sylvan Heights contains around 3,000 birds and 170 species, including 30 species that cannot be seen in any other collection or zoo in North America.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p32-34, 35-36, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8405
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The bald eagle is making a comeback in North Carolina. Only one eagle was spotted in the state during 1982, compared to thirteen in 1985. A state ban on the pesticide DDT and the eagle's designation as a protected species are reasons for the bird's population growth. Dr. Richard Brown of the Carolina Raptor Center in Charlotte believes the state can do more. One of the biggest dangers to the state's bald eagles is ignorant hunters. Dr. Brown believes that the state should, as some states do, require a bird identification test before granting a gun license. Dr. Brown also advocates a reward system, under which private companies would grant money for any information on illegal hunting practices. Rewards up to $20,000 would provide sufficient motivation in turning over poachers, claims Dr. Brown.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p19, il
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Record #:
25520
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Researchers track golden-winged warblers from Western North Carolina to Central America to better understand this disappearing species. Research findings from the study shows that the loss in population is due to the disappearance of shrubby habitats. The loss in the Appalachian region is in part due to the conversion of agricultural lands to residential areas, changes in grazing practices to favor higher cattle densities, and land use for Christmas tree production.
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Record #:
9505
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Shorebirds that visit and nest near North Carolina's coastal waters are an asset to the beauty and natural history of that area; however, they are now facing a threat to their habitat--man. Dawkins focuses on Masonboro Island, a nine-and-a-half-mile barrier island south of Wrightsville Beach, to demonstrate how man's incursion here and in other coastal sections, is causing problems for birds that have used these islands in the past to establish nesting colonies and raise their young.
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Record #:
9871
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Two species of ibis have settled on Battery Island in the Cape Fear River--the white ibis and the glossy ibis. Around 9,000 pairs of white ibises nest there. Glossy ibis are rare in the state and only a dozen pairs were found there. Battery Island is leased from the state by the Audubon Society and is a protected sanctuary, one unit in Audubon's North Carolina Coastal Sanctuary System.
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Record #:
9964
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Nearly twenty species of songbirds that nest in North Carolina have had a decline in population over the past two decades. Annual breeding bird surveys over that period confirm this. Birds affected include the cardinal, mockingbird, bluejay, towhee, and meadowlark. Habitat destruction is affecting not only state nesters but also those in tropical rain forests.
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Record #:
106
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Professor Tom Quay's field course on North Carolina's colony-nesting waterbirds is helping enforcement officers protect the species.
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Record #:
1381
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Neotropical migrant birds, commonly referred to as songbirds, are facing a grim future owing to, among other factors, loss of habitat in North America.
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Record #:
1382
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Each June, North Carolina volunteers listen for bird calls to help chart long-term bird population trends.
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Record #:
1383
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While many factors seem to affect quail populations in the Southeast, the reduction of insects may be limiting the quail's brood habitat.
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