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8 results for Wildlife conservation--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
2834
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the late 1800s and early 1900s, demands by hat makers for plumage and restaurants for bird meat brought near extinction to coastal flocks. Efforts by T. Gilbert Pearson and others led to conservation laws that restored the birds by World War II.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1996, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2964
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deer poaching is a serious problem. To catch offenders, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission in 1990 instituted a program using deer decoys. In the past five years, Officer Tony Robinson of Burke County has arrested over 600 violators.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 2, July 1996, p32-33, il
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Record #:
26098
Author(s):
Abstract:
Proposed changes to the 1935 wildlife laws update many of the outdated and often contradictory laws. These changes provide provisions for stiffer penalties for violations, licensing of fur dealers and trapping permits, and greater authority to control harvesting and baiting.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Summer 1977, p24, 28
Record #:
26107
Author(s):
Abstract:
As of this fall, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission will assist law enforcement officers in the local laws pertaining to hunting and trapping of game and fur-bearing animals and birds.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 4, 1977, p2
Record #:
9817
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly enacted the Nongame Wildlife Tax Checkoff in 1983. This allows citizens to contribute a part or all of their state income tax refund to the management of nongame and endangered wildlife. Over 32,000 North Carolinians participated in 1985, contributing over $300,000 to the fund. Taylor summarizes how the funds were used for nongame and endangered wildlife and discusses plans for the third year of the program.
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Record #:
2791
Author(s):
Abstract:
Currently almost 1,000 non-game species in North Carolina receive little or no funding for research and management. The proposed $350 million federal Wildlife Diversity Funding Initiative would remedy this.
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Record #:
11573
Author(s):
Abstract:
For land owners and farm managers who want to improve wildlife habitats, the federally passed Farm Bill offers a number of programs to choose from. North Carolina landowners have used programs from the bill, such as no-till farming, to restore declining quail populations and other wildlife.
Record #:
31276
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildlife conservation in North Carolina in the past was generally a system of local self-government, but recognition of wildlife protection in the state began early. Local laws were many and diverse, and steadily the North Carolina General Assembly adopted state-wide regulations on conservation. With the development of state conservation laws and the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, conservation in the state focuses on regulation, enforcement, education, research, and management.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 22 Issue 1, May 1964, p16-17, 32, por