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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Alligators
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Record #:
5242
Author(s):
Abstract:
The American alligator is North Carolina's largest reptile. Alligators live mostly in swampy areas of the Coastal Plain, in places like Green Swamp in Columbus County and the Croatan National Forest in Carteret County. Areas like these are preferred living places because they are secluded, have a tolerable climate, and have plenty of food. Ellis describes these creatures and how they live.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 1, June 2002, p76-78, 80, 82, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5241
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The American alligator is North Carolina's largest reptile and can weigh up to 600 pounds and measure 12 feet. The state is the northern limit of their range, but they are not numerous here and live mostly on the outer Coastal Plain. Lee describes these creatures and how they live.
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Record #:
11913
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In southeastern North Carolina, three men, Gary Burns, David Grove, and Milton George, have built an alligator hunting business, capturing reptiles for profit. Trapping approximately five hundred gators in five years time, Burns, Grove, and George, sell their prizes to zoos, collecting anywhere from $20 to $150 a head.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 12, Nov 1963, p15-16, il, por
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Record #:
12197
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The American alligator is found in the wildest part of southeastern North Carolina near the coast. Belonging to an order of reptiles known as the Crocodilia containing 25 species, only two species of alligator are known, and North Carolinians should consider ourselves fortunate to have such an animal in our midst. Unfortunately, many American alligators are killed by hunters for the \"thrill,\" and unless a law is passes to protect the species, the alligator will fast disappear from the scene.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 8, Sept 1958, p12-13, por
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Record #:
13701
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Not all North Carolinians are aware of the alligator presence in the state. Noble discusses alligator hunting and the quest to remove these reptiles from state waters.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 28, Dec 1952, p5, 18, il, map
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Record #:
15535
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The natural range of the alligator extends as far north as the coastal swamps of the southeastern part of North Carolina. Montgomery relates some interesting facts about their habits.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 52, May 1935, p3, il
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Record #:
23305
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Abel Harmon studies alligators in eastern North Carolina's swamps and wetlands.
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Record #:
25966
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Two North Carolina men were among five arrested by federal agents in New Orleans. The men were charged with having American Alligator skins which violates the Endangered Species Act.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 5, Nov-Dec 1974, p17
Record #:
26079
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Abstract:
A significant contribution for American conservation efforts has been the removal of most of the nation’s alligators from the endangered species list. With the aid of federal and local legislation, less alligator species are threatened and endangered in the southern states.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Mar-Apr 1977, p3, il
Record #:
26404
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite the continued development of the alligator’s habitat, since its listing as an endangered species, the American Alligator has thrived under its protection.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 4, Oct 1979, p3, 10
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Record #:
6598
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Abstract:
The American alligator is North Carolina's largest reptile and can weigh up to 600 pounds and measure 12 feet. Most range along the coastal swamps of the southeastern part of the state. Amundson describes the alligator's characteristics, breeding habits, food habits, and habitats.
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Record #:
9762
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The natural range of the alligator extends as far north as the coastal swamps of the southeastern part of North Carolina. These creatures are experiencing a modest population growth in the state, and Manley discusses what the future may hold for them.
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Record #:
1066
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The alligator, now protected under the Endangered Species Act, has found a home in certain areas of North Carolina.
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Record #:
26826
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There are alligators in North Carolina but we don’t yet know just how numerous they are. Biologists at North Carolina State University are conducting several studies to learn more about the alligator population and their feeding habits. Field studies will conclude with management recommendations.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 7, July 1981, p5-8, il
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Record #:
26849
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Abstract:
A North American alligator, which may be the largest ever found in the state, was found dead in the South River near Beaufort, North Carolina. Wildlife law enforcement is searching for the killer who shot the alligator. Under the federal Endangered Species Act, it is a criminal offense to kill an alligator in North Carolina.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 9, Sept 1981, p9, il