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102 results for North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine
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Record #:
16735
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Ghost stories and strange events abound in North Carolina. Harne recounts the story of a couple and their six-year old daughter who were sailing from California to Denmark when their vessel was disabled in rough seas off Ocracoke. The Coast Guard could not come because of the weather but maintained radio contact. Shortly thereafter a freighter appeared and the Captain told the boat's occupants he would remain during the night. Before the Coast Guard arrived in the morning, the freighter departed. The couple later learned that the Coast Guard could hear only their side of the conversation and could not pick up the ship on their radar. They also learned that the ship, the SS Potomac had gone down with all crewmen the year before.
Record #:
16730
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Augustin Daly, a native of Plymouth, was hailed as one of the all-time greats of the American stage in the 19th-century. He was famous on two continents as a playwright and theatre producer. He began writing plays in 1862, completing dozens of them, besides owning his own theatres in New York and London. Among his friends were Mark Twain, Gen. William T. Sherman, and Edwin Booth.
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Record #:
16732
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Jenkins recounts the history of Ahoskie's Gallery Theatre, which is in its forty-sixth season. In 1918, J. R. Garrett and his son Eric constructed the Richard Theatre, where people could view movies or vaudeville shows. By 1962, its time had passed and there was talk of demolishing the 700-seat theatre. However, there was also talk of renovation. The building survived and the theatre began. In 1985, the Gallery Theatre was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Record #:
16733
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Quida Wiggins, a native of Bertie County, graduated from high school in 1960 and left almost immediately to pursue a theatre career. She was one of the original Jeanette Hadley Players in New York City and the Theatre International in the Bronx. She has appeared in many plays and also worked in television, film and commercial voice-overs. In 2005, she came home to Bertie County. Fueston describes her activities since her return.
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Record #:
16731
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The Martin County Players, like most community theatres, started small. Now a mainstay for over twenty-five years, Stotesbury recounts how the group began and developed over that period.
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Record #:
16755
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Ronnie and Angie Lewis opened the Tar Heel Variety Theatre in Chocowinity in 2002. It offers family-friendly entertainment, and there is no profanity from either the performers or audience and no alcohol served. All kinds of entertainment is presented from a time-honored country musician to a popular gospel singer or even a comic or magician.
Record #:
16756
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Feather Phillips founded the Pocosin Arts Folk School in Columbia, Tyrrell County in 1994. Its purpose was \"to expand understanding of the relationship between people and place, culture and environment through the exhibition and production of the traditional arts of the people of the Pocosin region of North Carolina.\" Boerema describes activities at the center.
Record #:
16758
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The North Carolina Naval Squadron Montgomery True Blues of Hyde County preserves local historical events through reenactments of the Civil War. The group organized in 2001 and portrays the Confederate Navy with a marine detachment. Among their activities are serving as crew of the CSS Albemarle in Plymouth, being the training crew of the CSS Neuse in Lenoir County, and taking part in the annual battle at Fort Branch in Hamilton.
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Record #:
16761
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Mike and Ali Lubbock founded the Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Center in Scotland Neck in Halifax County in 1989, after spending five years in Sylva. Covering about nine acres, the center boasts the largest collection of waterfowl in the world and is a conservation and research orientated center for birds, especially rare and endangered waterfowl. Sylvan Heights contains around 3,000 birds and 170 species, including 30 species that cannot be seen in any other collection or zoo in North America.
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Record #:
16762
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Created in 1975, the Historic Albemarle Tour is the oldest organized Heritage Trail in the southeast. The tour covers 17 eastern counties and 29 natural and historic sites, including lighthouses and life-saving stations, the state's oldest surviving colonial architecture, museums, formal gardens, and an aquarium. Historic Albemarle Tour signposts along the roads guide travelers.
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Record #:
16760
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When Hurricane Isabel blew the water out of the Cashie River in Bertie County in 2003, the remains of a large wooden ship were visible. Photographs were sent to the Underwater Archaeology Department at East Carolina University and researchers spent two seasons working on the wreck in 2009 and 2010. Fueston describes some of their findings.
Record #:
16763
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The Pamlico House, located in Washington in Beaufort County, was built in 1906 as a home for the rector of St. Peters Episcopal Church and his large family. The house became a bed and breakfast in 1980, and in 2005 it was purchased for private ownership. Virginia Finnerty purchased it in 2010 and now operates it as a bed and breakfast inn.
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Record #:
16757
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The Lakeland Theatre operates in an old high school in Littleton. Mark Taylor, a professional actor and Littleton native, bought the building in 1978 when he returned home with the idea of starting a cultural arts center and the Lakeland Cultural Arts Center was born. Luthy describes the theatre's activities.
Record #:
16759
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Terra Ceia, a tiny Dutch community in Beaufort County, keeps its heritage alive with a flower-filled festival. Boerema describes the festivals that were held there from 1937-1941, when they were suspended during World War II.
Record #:
21749
Author(s):
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Phillip and Karen Lynch Harley live in Hollister in Halifax County. She is a member of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe and he grew up in Maryland with the Picataway Native American tribe. Karen minored in art at the University of Maryland and later attended the prestigious Schuler School of Fine Arts in Baltimore. Phillip is a completely self-taught wood-carver and makes everything from wooden spoons, bowls, walking sticks, and people. Together they create works that keep their Native American heritage alive.
Source:
North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine (NoCar F 252.3 N82), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Spr 2014, p50-51,54-56, il, por