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11 results for Wildlife restoration
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Record #:
6597
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During 1950-51, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's Big Game Restoration Program stocked 125 deer on three new wildlife refuges. Barick describes the areas which include Lake Lure Refuge, Hanging Rock State Park, and Little Grandfather Mountain Wildlife Management Area. Restocked areas are closed to hunting for a minimum of five years to allow the stock to multiply.
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Record #:
9619
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When North Carolina's wild turkey population reached its lowest point at 2,000 birds statewide around 1970, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the National Wild Turkey Federation joined forces to develop a restoration plan.
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Record #:
16439
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Pen-raised quail are useful for training dogs and for stocking on heavily used, controlled-shooting preserves. However, there is as yet no documented evidence that the release system results in long-term quail restoration. The writer says the best way to restore quail is to restore the habitat first.
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Record #:
9458
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North Carolina's wild turkey population, currently at 5,000, is the lowest among the Southeastern states. This number exists only because the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission began a project in 1971 to restore the turkey to its old habitats. Waldorf discusses the progress made on this project and what needs to be done to stop habitat destruction.
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Record #:
9552
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Taylor reports on the state's ongoing deer restoration project. The first serious attempts at restoration took place in the 1890s on the Biltmore Estate near Asheville. By the 1930s there were only a few thousand left in North Carolina. However, current work by the North Carolina Wildlife resources Commission has brought the statewide population back to between 400,000 and 500,000.
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Record #:
9845
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By the start of the 20th-century, wild turkeys were almost eliminated from North Carolina's forests and woodlands. However, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's restoration program has been very successful, and the turkey population is climbing.
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Record #:
9974
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Waterfowl restoration in the state involves protecting and enhancing wintering habitats for birds that are born far to the north. Monschein discusses several programs that have this goal: Canada Goose Field Sanctuary/Feeding Area Program, North American Waterfowl Management Plan, and the M.A.R.S.H. Program.
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Record #:
3667
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Restoration of the wild turkey by the N.C. Wildlife Commission is nearly complete. With the western counties of the state restocked, predictions are that the eastern half will be done by the year 2000.
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Record #:
6655
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The wild turkey has made a remarkable recovery in North Carolina. From a low of 2,000 in 1970, wild turkeys are now found in all one hundred of the state's counties. Many individuals and groups have played a part in this conservation success story. However, one person deserves special credit for the turkey's comeback. That person is Wayne Bailey, who was the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's lead turkey biologist during the critical decade of the 1970s. Bailey is profiled in this Casada article.
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Record #:
26756
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Federal Aid funds have been appropriated to North Carolina for sport fish and wildlife restoration and hunter education programs. The funds come from an excise tax on fishing rods, reels, and artificial baits, lures and flies.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1983, p5
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Record #:
15309
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Gopher frogs were once common in the lower Coastal Plain and the Sandhills, but loss of habitat has reduced their number. Using one of the few remaining wild populations, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher are partnering to raise gopher frogs for restoration.
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