NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


16 results for Deer
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
2785
Author(s):
Abstract:
Founded in 1965, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MEDSA) in Winston-Salem houses reconstruction's of actual rooms from historic houses located across the South.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 10, Mar 1988, p8-11, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2964
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deer poaching is a serious problem. To catch offenders, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission in 1990 instituted a program using deer decoys. In the past five years, Officer Tony Robinson of Burke County has arrested over 600 violators.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 2, July 1996, p32-33, il
Full Text:
Record #:
3226
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1994, between 8,000 and 9,000 of the 219,000 automobile accidents compiled by the UNC Highway Safety Research Center involved deer. Most accidents occurred in the Coastal Plain during fall hunting season.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6597
Author(s):
Abstract:
During 1950-51, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's Big Game Restoration Program stocked 125 deer on three new wildlife refuges. Barick describes the areas which include Lake Lure Refuge, Hanging Rock State Park, and Little Grandfather Mountain Wildlife Management Area. Restocked areas are closed to hunting for a minimum of five years to allow the stock to multiply.
Subject(s):
Record #:
9354
Abstract:
Seamster discusses how proper forestry management techniques will improve both the size and quality of deer herds and still provide for the necessary harvest of timber.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
19124
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time deer were almost extinct in the state. Now about 1.25 million deer roam North Carolina's one hundred counties, causing damage to landscapes, farm crops, and forests. Nationwide the damage exceeds $2 billion. Cox suggests some ways deer may be deterred from unwanted visits.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
9552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Taylor reports on the state's ongoing deer restoration project. The first serious attempts at restoration took place in the 1890s on the Biltmore Estate near Asheville. By the 1930s there were only a few thousand left in North Carolina. However, current work by the North Carolina Wildlife resources Commission has brought the statewide population back to between 400,000 and 500,000.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
677
Author(s):
Abstract:
For white-tailed deer, summer is the time to raise young, grow antlers, eat heartily, and frolic.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
2894
Author(s):
Abstract:
Each year deer are involved in around 9,000 traffic accidents statewide. Steps drivers can take to avoid accidents include being cautious at dusk and dawn and learning deer habitats.
Full Text:
Record #:
3136
Author(s):
Abstract:
N.C. Hunters for the Hungry is a program through which hunters donate extra deer for distribution to charitable groups, including orphanages, homeless shelters, and soup kitchens. Since 1993, over 55,000 pounds have been donated.
Full Text:
Record #:
4616
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over 5 percent (11,129) of all traffic accidents reported in North Carolina in 1997 involved deer/vehicle collisions. The majority of these occurred in the eastern half of the state. Hyde County, for example, reported that deer were involved in 40 percent of all accidents. Half of this kind of accident typically occurs in fall and early winter, and 75 percent happens between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. About 8 percent of drivers are injured, but most of the damage is sustained by the deer and the vehicle.
Full Text:
Record #:
4991
Author(s):
Abstract:
Automobile accidents involving deer continue to rise. Over 5.6 percent (12,233) of all traffic accidents reported in the state in 1999 involved deer/vehicle collisions. This compares with 5 percent (11,503) accidents reported in 1998. Hyde County continued its high accident percentage with 54 accidents involving deer and 88 not.
Full Text:
Record #:
28521
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deer in North Carolina like to eat plants in gardens and can damage landscape. The North Carolina Cooperative Extension recommends three primary strategies to keeping deer at bay. These include physical barriers, repellents and making appropriate plant choices.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Mar 2017, p10-12, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
29613
Author(s):
Abstract:
When North Carolina’s archery season begins in September, a key factor for bow hunters’ success is deducing what local whitetail deer will be eating. Deer in northeastern North Carolina have a reputation for growing large due to the abundance of crops. Understanding what kind of food deer eat can help hunters determine hunting positions.
Record #:
38156
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fur resources biologist Ken Wilson recounts some of the things he has witnessed while working in the field, such as animal behaviors and encounters with trappers.
Subject(s):