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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Poaching
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Record #:
2964
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Deer poaching is a serious problem. To catch offenders, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission in 1990 instituted a program using deer decoys. In the past five years, Officer Tony Robinson of Burke County has arrested over 600 violators.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 2, July 1996, p32-33, il
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Record #:
26459
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A public awareness programs, Wildlife Watch, enrolls citizens to help in controlling wildlife violations in coastal North Carolina.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 6, Jun 1980, p9
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Record #:
26658
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In January 1985, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission arrested a group of black market dealers and poachers of striped bass from state inland waters. Other illegal activity has been night deer hunting. State laws need to be strengthened to prevent these illegal activities.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 4, July/Aug 1986, p3, por
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Record #:
1264
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Countless reptiles and amphibians are being collected across North Carolina and sold both legally and illegally; the growing international black market threatens to wipe out rare species.
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Record #:
3913
Author(s):
Abstract:
Poaching, or hunting game animals illegally, is a serious problem, with 621 arrests for night hunting in 1997 alone. Most hunters obey the law, but the few violators not only destroy wildlife but also endanger citizens and the N.C. Wildlife Commission officers who enforce the law.
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Record #:
5951
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ginseng, an endangered plant that has medicinal properties, is highly prized by plant poachers. The dried roots sell from $270 to $600 a pound. Stealing an endangered plant is also a felony, but that hasn't stopped poachers from targeting growing areas near the Blue Ridge Parkway and in the Great Smokies. Nickens discusses the work of North Carolina Department of Agriculture agents in combating plant theft.
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