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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Land use
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Record #:
11004
Abstract:
There are hundreds of holes across the state left by sand and gravel mining operations. Many are unsightly and many are dangerous. Few are of any use after the mining is finished, and they also constitute a liability. This articles presents information on applying the techniques of good land use to holes in the ground.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p102-103, 278-279, il
Record #:
26584
Author(s):
Abstract:
Conflict between landowners and hunters occasionally occurs in North Carolina, as public hunting lands become more crowded. There is still private land for hunting, but finding it takes resourcefulness, honesty and plain old-fashioned courtesy.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 4, July/Aug 1989, p6-8, il, por
Record #:
26591
Author(s):
Abstract:
There is considerable debate over fee hunting in North Carolina. Many argue they have the right to hunt and should not have to pay a fee. The dilemma is further complicated by land owner rights and public land access.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1989, p9-11, il
Record #:
26667
Author(s):
Abstract:
Trespassing has become a big problem in North Carolina. As more acres are lost to development, growing numbers of outdoor recreationists are competing with each other for less space. Landowners are further hampered by too few officers to enforce trespassing.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1985, p3, il, por
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Record #:
12972
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina leads the country in the loss of farm and forest lands. In the last decade, over one million acres have been lost, and in their stead stand shopping centers, housing developments, parking lots and roads. With massive increases in population, especially in the area of retirees, and the ongoing destruction of the natural world, land conservation in North Carolina is crucial to its future.
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Full Text:
Record #:
26758
Author(s):
Abstract:
There is increasing debate over outdoor use of public and private lands. Privatization of federal public lands will affect us all but mostly those who wish to use public lands for recreation. The principal argument is that private ownership results in better, more profitable management.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1983, p6, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
27804
Author(s):
Abstract:
The second story in the series on fracking in North Carolina (first story in May 11, 2011 issue). Private landowners are signing one-sided contracts with exploration companies searching for natural gas. Under these contracts, private citizens will earn less than citizens in other states where fracking is common. Additionally, the private landowners will be liable for the cost of cleanup in the case of environmental disasters, fines for zoning and land use violations, and other legal fees. These fees will likely cost them more than they will make from the royalties on their land.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p5, 15 Periodical Website
Record #:
31731
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has been accurately described as a fortune state, with good soil, adequate water a favorable climate, and quantities of open land. With multiple land users seeking to access this land, the Soil Conservation Service provides professional help on planning the best use for a tract of land. This article discusses the agency and their services to land use, protection, development and a variety of other needs.
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Record #:
34312
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Abstract:
Concerns about the impact of human settlements on the available land suitable for agriculture have been rising rapidly during recent years. A study by the Pennsylvania State University Office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources determined the extent and geographic distribution of soil productivity for land presently under urbanization in the contiguous United States. Specific results for North Carolina are provided in this article, and show the status of soil resources in relation to urbanization.