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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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14 results for Wildlife habitat improvement
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Record #:
8787
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are two major threats to native plants in North Carolina. One is the habitat disruption that comes from construction and development. The second is nonnative plants, like kudzu and English ivy, which can dominate the habitats of the native species. Martin discusses the North Carolina Native Plant Society's work in protecting native plant species.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p144-146, 148, 150, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
26026
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildlife habitat conservation is key to species conservation; however, more habitats are being destroyed from deforestation and development. Conservation strategies are turning to zoos to provide appropriate habitat and resources for various species.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Summer 1976, p21, il
Record #:
26352
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Wildlife and Industry Together initiative is one of North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s flagship wildlife habitat enhancement programs. Companies help benefit wildlife by transforming underutilized property into healthy and attractive habitats.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Fall 2004, p2
Record #:
26363
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Federation aims to protect habitat for wildlife and foster ways for people to interact with nature. The Federation has developed several habitat enhancement programs and certified over one-thousand habitat locations across the state.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2003, p1-3, il
Record #:
26371
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildlife And Industry Together (WAIT) is a program focused on developing partnerships between corporate and conservation communities for wildlife habitat conservation. Corporate sites engaging in the wildlife enhancement program can improve employee morale, increase their image, develop community relationships, and receive other various benefits.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Spring 2001, p10-11, il
Record #:
26453
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bob Hazel is head of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s wildlife enhancement committee. This committee focuses on habitat preservation and management, and landowner and sportsmen relations. Bob is concerned about the future of hunting, and leads efforts to promote hunter education programs.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 39 Issue 40(1), Jan/Feb 1992, p7-8, por
Record #:
26495
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Wildlife Federation has established new priorities for wildlife enhancement activities. Priorities include increasing access to the outdoors, ensuring the safety of sportsmen, and pushing for greater habitat protection.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1991, p14, il
Record #:
26583
Author(s):
Abstract:
Waterfowl in eastern North Carolina will soon have a greater choice of wintering and nesting habitat thanks to the cooperative effort of Hyde County groups, private landowners, and Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. The Partners for Waterfowl Tomorrow initiative will assist landowners with the development of waterfowl habitat.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 4, July/Aug 1989, p5
Record #:
9787
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1983, the North Carolina General Assembly passed a law to fund waterfowl habitat preservation by asking waterfowl hunters to purchase a specially painted state duck stamp. The 1985 stamp features a pair of canvasback ducks and was painted by Tom Hirata, a nationally known wildlife artist. Over the past two years, $825,000 has been raised for waterfowl conservation.
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Record #:
26893
Author(s):
Abstract:
Problems associated with beavers in North Carolina are caused by the flooding of fields or timber. However, farmers can control flooded areas by installing a water-level control device to create a beaver pond and wildlife habitat. Beaver ponds also control siltation and serve as water reservoirs that can recharge depleted underground water supplies.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p12-13, il
Record #:
2927
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1983, the General Assembly passed a law to fund waterfowl habitat preservation by asking waterfowl hunters to purchase a specially painted state duck stamp. The stamp and limited edition art prints have raised over $3 million for the program.
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Record #:
28515
Author(s):
Abstract:
A transmission right-of-way near North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation’s Hamlet power plant will become a part of the state’s Butterfly Highway next spring. A one-acre plot was prepared with pollinator-friendly plants native to the state. This is part of a statewide conservation initiative aiming to restore habitats impacted by urbanization, land use change and agriculture.
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Record #:
28570
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the projects described, land owners can welcome more wildlife onto their property. Some easy projects to help welcome wildlife include creating a mini food plot, creating brush piles, cutting standing softwoods, creating an early successional area, girdling non-masting trees, and leaving standing den trees. The importance of planning, directions how to complete each project, and which types of wildlife will be attracted by these projects are all detailed.
Record #:
31570
Author(s):
Abstract:
While designed for flood prevention and other benefits, a watershed project can provide some unexpected beauty. The Bear Creek Watershed Project, which serves parts of Wayne, Greene and Lenoir Counties in eastern North Carolina, developed dams and a natural landscape to prevent erosion and flooding. The watershed also provides opportunities for bass fishing, nature enjoyment, and habitat for wildlife.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 8, Aug 1978, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website