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14 results for Simpson, Bob
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Record #:
5863
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County, located along the state's southeastern coast, is NEW EAST magazine's featured county of the month. Simpson discusses the history of the county and what attracts tourists.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p20-23, il
Record #:
25957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Miles of east coast beaches are at a serious threat to erosion, which in turn threatens property owners, tourism, and habitat. Although there are several methods for stopping erosion, the constant, complex processes of energy produce a relentless pressure on the coastline. Simpson argues that solutions may lie in good flood plain and coastal zone planning.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 3, Summer 1974, p11
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Record #:
26415
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Abstract:
At one time, market hunting was an acceptable practice because natural resources seemed to be unlimited. Now we know that there is a limit. To be good stewards, hunters and other outdoor recreationists must promote respect and awareness.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1994, p6, il
Record #:
29263
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, summer fishing is for tourists and fall is the time for fishermen’s fishing. The season usually begins with a mullet blow, a time when the fish become more active due to cooling shallow waters. Also typical of the boom in fall fishing is the well-fed king mackerel, gaining a pound per week in size.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p36-38, il
Record #:
35523
Author(s):
Abstract:
This industry was booming because of nearby waterways, plentiful workers, temperate climate, and better transportation facilities. On hand to help perpetuate the economic upswing were the financially salvaged Grady-White and Norfolk based Merrimack Marine.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1973, p16-17
Record #:
35555
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Core Sound was a village that might be rightly called a ghost town. Not a single living inhabitant resides there, as anyone who visits by ferry, beach buggy, or air can attest. In fact, only two things remained in a town the author proclaimed held promise upon its founding in 1753. One is the physical reminders of lifeways gone by, like an enclave of houses and outbuildings maintained by the owners’ descendants. Another was memories of life in a town that started its long, gradual decline by the early nineteenth century.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p12-15, 29
Record #:
35556
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a companion article to “Portsmouth Island Stands in the Backwash of Time” was a profile of the last permanent resident of the Core Sound town. Profiled was Henry Piggott, resident during the sum of his seventy four years and now resident of the family cemetery. Profiled also was the small pink house in which Piggott resided. The dwelling held remnants of lifeways gone by, such as the kitchen and bathroom as separate buildings.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p16-17
Record #:
35567
Author(s):
Abstract:
The attraction to the area, also known as the “Crystal Coast” or “Down East,” could be felt far and wide, extending from natives to visitors who became residents. Some of the hooks that this waterborne region could boast: pier fishing, big game fishing; charter boats. Other appealing aspects catered to land lovers. One, a thriving historical society, interests ranging from the area’s Colonial origins to association with Blackbeard. Another was the Croatan National Forest, a refuge for wildlife and hunter alike.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p20-23
Record #:
35568
Author(s):
Abstract:
This patch of swamp, ironically called barely habitable, has generated life and livelihood over the past two centuries. During its Colonial life: construction site for a canal, spearheaded by George Washington. During its Confederate past: inspiration for novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe. Early twentieth century: moneymaker site for commercial tour boat owners. Today: debating ground for establishing public recreation or water management sites.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p24-26, 28-29
Record #:
35578
Author(s):
Abstract:
Albemarle, in addition to being the name of a major waterway, comprises ten counties of the Coastal Region. How it contributed more than a name was expressed in agricultural income, as well as the Currituck Plan designed to improve the underdeveloped Outer Banks.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p24
Record #:
35576
Author(s):
Abstract:
High Yield Forestry found a yield not measured by lumber, and benefitted more than employees in this industry. The yield was measured also in fowl bagged and birds spotted, the benefactors local hunters and birdwatchers.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p20-21, 33
Record #:
35627
Author(s):
Abstract:
Summer fishing had its attraction, but it was more for tourists, the author opined. To his estimation, fishing in the time after the vacationers left had at least three special qualities. The onset of chill encouraging the catch to move to deeper waters, was the first. The departure of the masses leaves more space in the waterways, was the second. The exodus of summertime insects makes the experience on the open water more pleasant, was the third.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p30-33
Record #:
724
Abstract:
The Intracoastal Waterway spans 3,000 miles from Boston to Brownsville, and North Carolina's portion may be the most interesting stretch.
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Record #:
1888
Abstract:
The striped mullet, also known as the plebeian jumping mullet, is one of North Carolina's most abundant and economically important fishes.
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