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14 results for Dismal Swamp Canal (N.C. and Va.)
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Record #:
5034
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The Dismal Swamp Canal, located along the North Carolina-Virginia border, is the country's oldest continually operating manmade canal. Although digging of the canal did not start until 1793, a canal had been considered since William Byrd II first surveyed the area in 1728. The canal is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and today boating is limited to pleasure crafts only. Over 2,000 such boats pass through it yearly.
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Record #:
7723
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The Dismal Swamp Canal is the oldest continuously operating manmade canal in the country. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is designated as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The canal is also part of the National Underground Railroad Network, an escape route for slaves during pre-Civil War days. Green takes readers on a cruise from Elizabeth City, North Carolina, to Deep Creek, Virginia, highlighting the canal's engineering and its role in history.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p12-16, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8419
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Built in the 1790s, the Dismal Swamp Canal connects Elizabeth River in Virginia to the Pasquotank River in North Carolina. George Washington and five associates began the canal to transport juniper and cypress out of eastern North Carolina. Later, Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, built in 1835, competed against the Dismal Swamp Canal. Traffic along the Dismal Swamp Canal peaked around 1900. Since 1928, the canal has been under the control of the Army Corps of Engineers. Today, the canal is facing a cut in federal funds. Congressman Walter D. Jones is heading the fight to keep the canal open. He expects a tough road over the ensuing years owing to large federal deficits.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 12, May 1985, p12-14, il
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Record #:
11701
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Proposed in 1784 and passed by an enabling acts in 1787 and 1790, construction of the Dismal Swamp Canal began in 1793. Upon completion and increased use, this region became a resort destination for fashionables, beginning in the 1830s. A rival canal, the Albemarle-Chesapeake, opened in 1859, causing a decline in the use and popularity of the Dismal Swamp Canal. Phased out with the inception of railroads and motor vehicles, the canal experienced further decline at the hands of real estate developers as well as receding water levels.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 9, Sept 1964, p13, 33, il
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Record #:
12934
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The Dismal Swamp Canal Welcome Center in Camden County has a unique feature. It is the only one in the country that serves both a waterway and a highway. Approximately half a million cars and two thousand boats stop by each year.
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Record #:
13194
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Will Lake Drummond cease to feed water to the Dismal Swamp Canal, a chore is has performed for a century and a half? The question remains as the waters of Lake Drummond fall desperately below normal levels.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 23, Apr 1956, p20-22, f
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Record #:
14553
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The history of the Dismal Swamp Canal dates back to 1763 when George Washington conceived its charter conceived and conducted the survey. Constructed by slaves in the early 19th-century through a desolate, swampy area, the canal was was a vital trading link, connecting eastern North Carolina and southern Virginia. Improvement by Army Engineers included dredging in 1946 to return the canal to a nine-foot depth.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 4, June 1946, p6-7, il
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Record #:
25577
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Located in Northeastern North Carolina, the Dismal Swamp was first noted on a 1647 map as “Terra Bassa” (low land). One of the largest swamps in the United States, it has been reduced to less than one-third the 1.4 million acres it covered when first discovered. The swamp isolated the region from major arteries of trade. In 1790, the legislature agree to dig the 22-mile-long Dismal Swamp Canal to create a commerce highway between Chesapeake Bay and the Albemarle Sound. The Dismal Swamp Canal, which is the oldest artificial waterway in the nation, now serves as an alternate route along the Intracoastal Waterway, utilized mostly by private boaters.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 1 Issue 3, May 13-26 1983, p1,5,7, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
30912
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A threat to close the Dismal Swamp Canal has been temporarily stopped by the actions of Congressman Herbert Bonner of the First District from North Carolina. When an appropriations bills on inland waterways was considered, an agreement was reached to allow the canal to continue operation for the next year. Bonner argued that closing the canal would put areas in Virginia and North Carolina at fire risk due to draining of the lakes and locks.
Record #:
35568
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This patch of swamp, ironically called barely habitable, has generated life and livelihood over the past two centuries. During its Colonial life: construction site for a canal, spearheaded by George Washington. During its Confederate past: inspiration for novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe. Early twentieth century: moneymaker site for commercial tour boat owners. Today: debating ground for establishing public recreation or water management sites.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p24-26, 28-29
Record #:
37841
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List of Stockholders in the Dismal Swamp Canal, 1791-1792.
Record #:
38124
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It’s actually a replica of the lighthouse built in 1886 and copies the screw-pile design of the original. However, the Roanoke River Lighthouse in Plymouth reveals a genuine interest in and truth about the lifeways of an earlier time in Eastern North Carolina. Included is a timeline for that’s representative of both this lighthouse and the time period in which it was constructed.