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9 results for Lumber trade--North Carolina
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Record #:
12037
Author(s):
Abstract:
Woodlands cover sixty percent of total land area in North Carolina, allowing for wood production to be the third largest industry in the state behind tobacco and textiles. Engineering products such as furniture, cut lumber, pulp, paper, veneer, cooperage, flooring, railroad ties, poles, posts, shingles, excelsior, plus additional products, forest industries account for seventeen percent of employment within the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 6, Aug 1957, p15, 17, il
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Record #:
12599
Author(s):
Abstract:
Patented by Phillip C. Hubbard, of Mio, Michigan and purchased by the Meadows Mills Company of North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, the mobile saw cut down costs and simplified the manufacturing process of wood.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 7, Aug 1957, p32, il
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Record #:
13140
Abstract:
The unique climatic position of North Carolina provides for an immense forest that blankets nearly 19 million acres. In 1952 along some $64 million worth of timber was cut from that forest, ranking North Carolina consistently among the top six lumbering states in the nation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 16, Dec 1955, p15-16, f
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Record #:
24204
Abstract:
McDowell Lumber Co. is a sawmill just outside of Asheboro that produces about 100,000 board feet a day and has expanded in size since 2001.
Record #:
24219
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina may be poised to lose more of its forest over the next several decades than any other state as ownership of forest land shifts and development increases.
Record #:
35576
Author(s):
Abstract:
High Yield Forestry found a yield not measured by lumber, and benefitted more than employees in this industry. The yield was measured also in fowl bagged and birds spotted, the benefactors local hunters and birdwatchers.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p20-21, 33
Record #:
36975
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the age of GPS devices, some tools introduced in the late 19th century are still tools of the trade for the lumbering industry around the world. Profiled and pictured are Caulk Boots, with spiked soles for traction and slippery surfaces; Pulaski Tool, with an ax on one side for chopping, a mattox on the other side for digging; and Biltmore Stick, used for calculating trees’ volume.
Record #:
36141
Author(s):
Abstract:
Though it was credited as reviving the post-Civil War economy, the lumbering industry had played a role in New Bern’s fiscal development since the Revolution period. Attesting to and assuring its longtime importance to New Bern were businesses such as the Blade Lumber Company and Weyerhaeuser Company, and the establishment of the Croatan National Forest.
Record #:
36454
Author(s):
Abstract:
Western North Carolina played an important role in the state’s economic and occupational development, through its railroads delivering raw materials such as lumber and mica across the state. Pictorial evidence Western Carolina University preserves includes the accompanying photo of the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad. Through such endeavors, acknowledgment of railroads’ place in North Carolina history chugging along.