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17 results for New Bern Historical Society
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Record #:
3780
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Taylor was a self-made man. From humble beginnings and little formal education, he built an insurance agency and ran it 55 years. He was instrumental in reorganizing the New Bern Historical Society in 1952 and served as its president for ten years.
Record #:
3779
Author(s):
Abstract:
The New Bern Historical Society is observing its seventy-fifth anniversary in 1998. Among those citizens instrumental in its founding were Mrs. Minnette Chapman Duffy and Miss Gertrude Carraway.
Source:
Journal of the New Bern Historical Society (NoCar F 264 N5 J66), Vol. 11 Issue 1, May 1998, p3-40, il, por, bibl
Record #:
27924
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prior to Gertrude Carraway’s recent death, she had many endeavors in the historical field bringing her accolades and honors from many quarters. Carraway was an active member of the New Bern Historical Society, and exerted her greatest effort toward the Tryon Palace restoration.
Source:
Journal of the New Bern Historical Society (NoCar F 264 N5 J66), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 1993, p25-28, por, bibl
Record #:
28012
Abstract:
The first tour of historic homes in New Bern was held in 1946. Since then, the New Bern Historical Society and the New Bern Preservation Foundation have continued to improve the tour by extending it to magnificent gardens, newly renovated homes and buildings, and unique attractions.
Source:
Record #:
28101
Author(s):
Abstract:
Battlefield tour guides from the New Bern Historical Society are preparing a manual which presents the script that will be used by guides in developing their own oral presentations for the five stations along the battlefield tour trail. Included in the manual is detailed background data about the battle, a bibliography, and related resources for further information.
Record #:
36124
Abstract:
Expected was the 1910 celebration: it was the bicentennial of New Bern’s founding. As for one not expected, the author explained its coming from the “tenor of the times.” It, hosted by the newly created historical society, had a guest list including descendants of Baron Christopher de Graffenried and Colonial homes open to visitors. Another aspect remembrance worthy was the first contribution to Tryon Palace’s 1950s restoration, a surplus from funds for the 1929 event.
Record #:
36135
Author(s):
Abstract:
This former soldier’s letters bear a close resemblance of the truth about life in combat. Expected details included troop movements and the Union army’s advantages. The unexpected was his surprise that the war continued, given the rules implemented by the times: short term enlistments, officers’ elections by their troops, and recruitment provisions such as apples and cigars.
Record #:
36136
Abstract:
The Union Army’s success in capturing New Bern in 1862 involved famous military men such as General Ambrose Burnside. The Confederate general presiding over the troop for this famous battle was Lawrence Branch. The latter, though perhaps lesser known in history books, was celebrated as equally important through the CSA monument in Cedar Grove Cemetery.
Record #:
36131
Author(s):
Abstract:
The church has had a broad appeal, in its denomination, the combined Christian Church and First Disciples of Christ, touted as the “largest denomination founded on American soil.” Its foundation was complete by the early nineteenth century, but it experienced a crumbling in terms of membership in the 1960s and early 1970s. By the new decade, though, it had rebuilt itself, congregation and worship space wise.
Record #:
36141
Author(s):
Abstract:
Though it was credited as reviving the post-Civil War economy, the lumbering industry had played a role in New Bern’s fiscal development since the Revolution period. Attesting to and assuring its longtime importance to New Bern were businesses such as the Blade Lumber Company and Weyerhaeuser Company, and the establishment of the Croatan National Forest.
Record #:
36138
Author(s):
Abstract:
The success of this industry the past two centuries could be attributed to the beauty and accessibility of this region, made possible through several types of local endeavors. Societies such as New Bern Historic Society and the town’s five museums preserve its cultural significance. Businesses such as Swiss Bear, Inc. promoted revitalization of its downtown economy. Events included Tryon Palace tours and annual Historic Homes and Gardens Tour.
Record #:
36140
Author(s):
Abstract:
The profile honored Minnette Chapman Duffy, who played an important role in the preservation of New Bern’s history. It discussed her Tennessee origins, introduction to New Bern via marriage, receiving the First Annual Gold Medal, and conversion of the Stanly House into the public library. Included was a photo of a profile-style painting of Duffy, originally hung in the Attmore-Oliver House and later donated to the New Bern Historical Society.
Record #:
36148
Abstract:
The window, located on the roof of the William B. Blades House, offered an extensive look into history. It had a bird’s eye view of the Great Fire of 1922, trio of hurricanes, Tryon Palace’s construction, the Bicentennial celebration, and election of the town’s first black mayor. Nationally famous figures referenced by this poem’s fifth grade author included Babe Ruth, President Harry S. Truman, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Record #:
36150
Author(s):
Abstract:
Training of a sort for his current work started with experience as a Boy Scout volunteer guide. This insider’s perspective of the Harvey Mansion discloses its history, including its time as an apartment building. Also explored were architectural aspects such as closet space, which the author declared was once an amenity that only the wealthy could afford.
Record #:
36153
Abstract:
The question: who owned the land, the German Palatines or Swiss paupers. The answer: evident in the descendants for those two groups. After two centuries, they still reside in the area named New Bern by their ancestors.