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7 results for Locomotives--History
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Record #:
3085
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Abstract:
For over thirty years, Floyd McEachern has collected material from the era of steam engines. Today his more than 3,000 items, including hand lanterns, train uniforms, and a caboose, are on display at the Historical Train Museum in Dillsboro.
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Record #:
9234
Abstract:
In 1977, the Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad's steam locomotive Number 40 was moved to Connecticut. Built in 1920, the locomotive will be operated by Valley Railroad which specializes in tourist trains.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 5, Oct 1979, p17, il
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Record #:
10727
Abstract:
Goldsboro, North Carolina was home to a locomotive manufacturing firm from the 1890s into the 1920s. The company, still active today as a foundry and steel fabricator, is Dewey Brothers and its locomotive building days spanned a period of approximately 30 years. Loggers, quarry operators, and other users of small locomotives relied on the Dewey engines, available in either standard or narrow gauge, not so much for railroad use as for operation on private tracks where duty was lighter and track more flimsy and uneven.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 17, Feb 1970, p13-14, il
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Record #:
19457
Abstract:
The steam locomotive, Cliffside Railroad 110, operated on the three-mile Cliffside Railroad in Rutherford County from the early 1900s until it was replaced by a more efficient diesel in 1962. The locomotive has been in residence at the Stone Mountain Park in Georgia for a number of years, but it was recently returned to the New Hope Valley Railroad Association in Wake County. The Association plans to restore it over the next five to seven years at an estimated cost of $350,000 to $500,000.
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Record #:
30757
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Abstract:
The New NC Transportation Museum at Historic Spenser Shops had its grand opening on September 12 with special events over the weekend for the media, government officials and volunteers. Events included facility tours, rail service, the dedication of the Bob Julian Roundhouse, a black-tie gala and concluded on Sunday with a grand opening for the public.
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Record #:
35853
Author(s):
Abstract:
Railroading in this case involved Pullman cars. Riding the rails the fashioned way was still possible through the National Railroad Historic Society and smaller model railroad groups. Highlighting the difference of the train experience not by Amtrak were factors involved with steam and coal power locomotives. Illustrating the uniqueness also was a description of a trip starting in Roanoke and ending in Greensboro.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p17-19
Record #:
36454
Author(s):
Abstract:
Western North Carolina played an important role in the state’s economic and occupational development, through its railroads delivering raw materials such as lumber and mica across the state. Pictorial evidence Western Carolina University preserves includes the accompanying photo of the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad. Through such endeavors, acknowledgment of railroads’ place in North Carolina history chugging along.