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11 results for Roanoke River
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Record #:
437
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Abstract:
Unnatural flooding has impacted wild turkey habitat use and population dynamics along the Roanoke River.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, May/June 1992, p8-10, il, map
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Record #:
1118
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The first in a two-part series, this article addresses the effects of the annual flooding of the Roanoke River on wild turkey populations. The authors are critical of the flooding, and suggest that the river's flood pattern be checked.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1993, p13-15, por
Record #:
10828
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Abstract:
The history of the Roanoke River in Martin County dates back to the time of Sir Walter Raleigh. Crews of men from Raleigh's expedition oared their way up the Roanoke to the present day site of the Williamston bridge before being attacked and driven back to their boats by Tuscarora Indian warriors. Since that time, the Roanoke has served Martin County as a fishery, as a means of transportation, as a resource for manufacturing plants, and even as a military conduit during the Civil War. Because of this long-term interconnectivity, many Martin County residents feel that the river, despite flowing through two states and many counties, is their own.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 1, June 1967, p8-9, il
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Record #:
23292
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The lower Roanoke River provides locals and visitors with all sorts of outdoor activities. The historical river has supported farmers, provided cover for slaves and moonshiners, and served as a means for transport of goods.
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Record #:
23295
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An 18-foot sabre that made a 1958 journey from Plymouth NC to Miami FL is now housed in the Roanoke River Maritime Museum.
Subject(s):
Record #:
25999
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The Southside Electric Cooperative of Virginia is researching the application of a complex conventional and pumped storage hydro-electric plants on the main-stem of the Roanoke River and its major tributaries. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission opposes these water development projects due to adverse affects on the fisheries resources, which also compromises outdoor recreational activities in the area.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 5, Nov-Dec 1975, p27
Record #:
9503
Author(s):
Abstract:
Floating down a river can be an ideal way to vacation and explore natural surroundings. One river that is often overlooked for floating is the Roanoke River in northeastern North Carolina. Its high banks offer good camping sites, and it flows through some of the state's interesting countryside. Lynch describes a thirty-five-mile floating trip on the Roanoke from Scotland Neck to Hamilton.
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Record #:
2852
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Sterling Keeter's life has been a long association with the Roanoke River near his home in Weldon. His eighty-five years are crowded with outdoor experiences, floods, rockfish, and river history.
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Record #:
5050
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The floodplain of the Roanoke River has one of the mid-Atlantic states' most diverse eco-systems. Protecting the quality of the river is an on-going concern. In 1999, plans to build a paper plant near Weldon and more recently a company's plan to turn eighteen miles of the river into a barge canal were both canceled through citizens' protests. Still, concern exists as to whether that support will continue into the future, especially in an area where industry is needed and jobs are scarce.
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Record #:
34855
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Film producer and journalist Robyn Yigit Smith details the journey she and her sister Karen made to the Cypress Grill along the Roanoke River. The Cypress Grill is only open January through April and serves old-fashioned pies that helped the reputation of this small establishment grow.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 10, March 2018, p114-120, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35853
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Abstract:
Railroading in this case involved Pullman cars. Riding the rails the fashioned way was still possible through the National Railroad Historic Society and smaller model railroad groups. Highlighting the difference of the train experience not by Amtrak were factors involved with steam and coal power locomotives. Illustrating the uniqueness also was a description of a trip starting in Roanoke and ending in Greensboro.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p17-19