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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Dossett, Ted
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Record #:
9193
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Between 1850 and 1973, twenty-eight birds, sixteen mammals, and twelve fishes have become extinct across the nation. North Carolina has also had its share of vanishing species, including the woods bison, buffalo, elk, passenger pigeon, Carolina parakeet, and ivory-billed woodpecker. Dossett discusses reasons for this and what steps, if any, have been taken to prevent extirpation of species.
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Record #:
9215
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The 29,000-acre New Hope Game Land in Chatham County is part of a 47,000-acre project being developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Dossett discusses some of the problems and the potential connected with the project.
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Record #:
9547
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Dossett discusses one of the world's rarest fish, the Roanoke bass, a fish that lives in the streams of the North Carolina Piedmont. Although its range is restricted to that area, it is fairly abundant in the streams it inhabits.
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Record #:
3014
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Wildlife observations for most people occur through accidental meetings, but successful observers know that many factors, including patience, habitat knowledge, and knowledge of wildlife behavior, are necessary for good viewing.
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Record #:
3433
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From the earliest Native American dugouts to 20th-century crafts, boat designs in the state were determined by their historical period and the inland waterways on which they were used.
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Record #:
3641
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At one time, over 1,300 varieties of apples grew throughout the Southeast. Today, only a few hundred survive. On his Chatham County farm, Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr. seeks to preserve the apple heritage by collecting and growing over 350 varieties.
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Record #:
2852
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Sterling Keeter's life has been a long association with the Roanoke River near his home in Weldon. His eighty-five years are crowded with outdoor experiences, floods, rockfish, and river history.
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