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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Stream conservation
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Record #:
1514
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Black River contains clean water and cypress trees thought to be up to 2,000 years old. Friends of the river hope to protect its pristine condition.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1994, p2-9, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
1937
Author(s):
Abstract:
Instituting a new definition of \"critical habitat\" for freshwater fish and mussels may be North Carolina's most important conservation battle of the year. The new definition would require a conservation plan for 25 streams where the species live.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p6-7, il
Record #:
2832
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bioengineering, the combining of natural fibers and plants with man-made structures, is a technique used to restore streams damaged by building developments and other pollution sources to a more natural state.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1996, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
9655
Author(s):
Abstract:
Restoration of urban streams is increasing in North Carolina and across the rest of the country. These waterways have been buried under parking lots, culverts, or similar structures. Angione explores two projects that are becoming international models for stream restoration success Rocky Branch, which flows through the North Carolina State University Campus and Little Sugar Creek, which flows under a parking lot in Charlotte.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2008, p16-20, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
10560
Author(s):
Abstract:
North State Environmental Inc. is a runner-up in the 2008 BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA Small Business of the Year competition. Stephanie and Darrell Westmoreland, founded the company, which focuses on stream restoration, in Winston-Salem in 1994. North State employs sixty and projects revenues in 2008 of $8 million.
Record #:
25287
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tom Duckwall explains the importance of water temperature in streams and what mechanisms can affect that temperature.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p1, 3, il
Record #:
5050
Author(s):
Abstract:
The floodplain of the Roanoke River has one of the mid-Atlantic states' most diverse eco-systems. Protecting the quality of the river is an on-going concern. In 1999, plans to build a paper plant near Weldon and more recently a company's plan to turn eighteen miles of the river into a barge canal were both canceled through citizens' protests. Still, concern exists as to whether that support will continue into the future, especially in an area where industry is needed and jobs are scarce.
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Record #:
33347
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1983 the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development launched a new program called Stream Watch. The program aims to encourage citizens’ awareness of watersheds and water resource management, and to establish a partnership among citizens, industries, and state and local governments. Over the past three years, a strong network of diverse groups has been active in the conservation of North Carolina’s major river basins.