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34 results for Environmental education
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Record #:
1550
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation is attempting to establish a permanent educational center to teach regional residents about area natural resource issues. A proposed site in Washington, NC, has been tentatively selected and fund raising has begun.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Winter 1993, p1, por
Record #:
3412
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Fox Creek Nature Lab, a fifty-two acre outdoor learning project in Louisburg, Franklin County, features a trail with learning stations on water quality, living wetlands, wildlife enhancement, and forestry management.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 47 Issue 8, Aug 1997, p6-7, il
Record #:
3497
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Haw River Festival stresses kindness toward the environment. The three-week festival, with sites near Greensboro, Saxapahaw, and Bynum, teaches people about river lore and ecology, as well as manmade problems that threaten it, like mill dyes.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 21, May 1997, p11,13-14, il Periodical Website
Record #:
5078
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sid Baynes has retired from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission after 31 years of service. Baynes, a North Carolina State University graduate, began his career as a wildlife biologist. In 1976, he was named chief of the Division of Conservation Education.
Record #:
5228
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Highlands Biological Station was founded in 1927 and is part of the University of North Carolina system. The station includes a botanical garden, nature center, research facilities, and public programs. The center focuses on interpreting the natural and cultural heritage of the Southern Appalachians.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
12287
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Highlands Biological Station was founded in 1927 and is part of the University of North Carolina. The center focuses on interpreting the natural and cultural heritage of the Southern Appalachians. Since 1946, Dr. Thelma Howell has directed the work of the station. She will retire in the fall of 1971. Styron describes the station's accomplishments under her direction.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 7, Sept 1971, p1321, por
Full Text:
Record #:
25090
Author(s):
Abstract:
Educating students on the environment is important. NC State University conducted a study to determine if sending students outside to learn in the field would provide a better understanding of how the environment changes.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2013, p24-27, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25171
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whether we choose to accept it or not, the human race is quickly reaching its carrying capacity. What happens when we do is the real problem.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Winter 1988, p4
Record #:
25203
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort County has a plan for a new Estuarine Education Center. The plan so far has raised quite a bit of money and is supported among members of the community as well.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 12 Issue 4, Summer 1993, p6
Record #:
25207
Author(s):
Abstract:
There has long been a debate about dominion versus stewardship when it comes to man’s creation. Some churches are now using that debate to talk about man’s responsibility to the environment.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Fall 1993, p5, il
Record #:
25229
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jim Stephenson discusses all the great opportunities the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation has had in a year of him being director of the organization.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p2, por
Record #:
25246
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Student Outreach Series has educated 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 12th graders on environmental issues in a way they can understand and one that will, hopefully, get them more involved in protecting the environment.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Summer 2001, p5, por
Record #:
26366
Author(s):
Abstract:
Staff of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation traveled around the state to promote wildlife conservation, introduce habitat enhancement projects, and help people become involved in nature.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2003, p3, il
Record #:
26507
Abstract:
For this year’s Earth Day, the North Carolina Wildlife Federation is joining other environmental groups to plan a number of citizen outreach programs. They are promoting daily activities that can lessen human impact on the environment.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990, p9, il
Record #:
26526
Author(s):
Abstract:
The importance of education is a cornerstone of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation philosophy. The Federation is looking at the environment in a much broader context than it has in the past, and is working to educate people how environmental issues affect what they like to do.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 3, May/June 1990, p8-11, il, por