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8 results for Kerr Reservoir
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Record #:
1118
Abstract:
The first in a two-part series, this article addresses the effects of the annual flooding of the Roanoke River on wild turkey populations. The authors are critical of the flooding, and suggest that the river's flood pattern be checked.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1993, p13-15, por
Record #:
25972
Author(s):
Abstract:
Controversy continues over the closing of W. Kerr Scott Reservoir to hunting. The Wilkes County lake was closed by the US Army Corps of Engineers due to issues with waterfowl hunting. Although the Corps has reopened part of the lake, sportsmen along with the NC Wildlife Resources Commission remain concerned about the Corps’ influence with a public property.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Jan-Feb 1975, p28
Record #:
25999
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Southside Electric Cooperative of Virginia is researching the application of a complex conventional and pumped storage hydro-electric plants on the main-stem of the Roanoke River and its major tributaries. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission opposes these water development projects due to adverse affects on the fisheries resources, which also compromises outdoor recreational activities in the area.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 5, Nov-Dec 1975, p27
Record #:
26821
Author(s):
Abstract:
Largemouth bass in Kerr Scott Reservoir in Wilkes County are frantically searching for a place to spawn. A joint project conducted by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will improve bass health and bass fishing by building artificial spawning sites for bass in several locations.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 6, June 1981, p15
Record #:
29531
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tourism in Vance County, North Carolina is centered on Kerr Lake which encompasses seven recreation areas for boating and fishing. Despite the popularity of Kerr Lake, there are other tourist destinations in the county such as car shows and Civil War trails.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 7, Jul-Sup 2007, p14-17, por
Record #:
30393
Author(s):
Abstract:
Vance, Granville, and Warren counties in North Carolina are sporting new looks with the creation of a 51,200 acre lake behind John H. Kerr Dam. The 800 mile shoreline of the lake straddles the North Carolina-Virginia line, and what once was farm land is now brimming with bass, catfish, ducks, and geese. Kerr Lake is now open year round for boating, swimming, fishing, and other outdoor recreational activities.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
32010
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1963, the W. Kerr Scott Dam and Reservoir near Wilkesboro has benefitted the area by providing flood protection along the Yadkin River, as well as recreational opportunities and jobs. Operation Mainstream, a work-study program for the chronically unemployed, provides workers from Wilkes County to help clean up the debris left by the flood waters contained by the reservoir. In exchange, the workers get a paycheck, work counseling, and a basic education.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 3, Mar 1971, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35750
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author’s discussion of NC lakes reflected their importance as a source of recreation such as fishing and swimming, as well as backdrops for camping and picnicking. Examples were size (the Kerr Reservoir, fifty thousand acres), type (natural lakes are only in the Coastal Plain), and depth (Mattamuskeet, its greatest depth five feet). Discussed also were eastern lakes’ three groupings (peninsula between Pamlico River and Albemarle Sound; Pocosin slough between New Bern and Bogue Sound; in Columbus and Bladen county).
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p23-24