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7 results for Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge
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Record #:
879
Abstract:
The Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge's open house in December is a great chance for people to rediscover nature and small \"critters\" of all kinds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 7, Dec 1992, p22-24, il
Full Text:
Record #:
26012
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge will again open to sport fishing in March 1976. The refuge has been closed to activity since November 1975 to minimize waterfowl disturbance but will now open to sport and bow fishing during daylight only and within only certain areas.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Mar-Apr 1976, p16, il
Record #:
26539
Author(s):
Abstract:
A limited, controlled duck hunt will be carried out on the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge this fall, along with a sponsored youth hunt.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 11, Nov 1980, p8, 9
Record #:
26876
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge hosted its third annual National Hunting and Fishing Day celebration to commemorate the contributions that sportsmen have made to wildlife conservation. The event featured wildlife presentations, gun and archery safety courses, poster contest, and a fishing tournament.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 1, Jan 1982, p5, por
Record #:
35750
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author’s discussion of NC lakes reflected their importance as a source of recreation such as fishing and swimming, as well as backdrops for camping and picnicking. Examples were size (the Kerr Reservoir, fifty thousand acres), type (natural lakes are only in the Coastal Plain), and depth (Mattamuskeet, its greatest depth five feet). Discussed also were eastern lakes’ three groupings (peninsula between Pamlico River and Albemarle Sound; Pocosin slough between New Bern and Bogue Sound; in Columbus and Bladen county).
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p23-24
Record #:
38130
Author(s):
Abstract:
This avian sanctuary offers more than shelter for a myriad of water and land fowl. For North Carolina and Virginia’s public school students, it has become a popular field trip destination. On a higher education note, East Carolina University and Sylvan Heights are collaborating in endangered species conservation and research opportunities. Individuals of all ages can partake in its other educational endeavors: festivals, guided tours, conservation and research talks, field sketching workshops, and birding trips.
Record #:
39511
Author(s):
Abstract:
Serving as a tour guide for North Carolina’s three regions, the author advises for these areas the best places to visit, best times of the year to visit, and special considerations to take when visiting. Regarded must see areas included Pocosin Lakes and Mattamuskeet Wildlife Refuges; Swift Creek Bluffs and Johnston Mill Nature Preserves; Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
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