NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


26 results for Great Smoky Mountains National Park (N.C. and Tenn.)
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
2903
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sixty-six species of mammals inhabit the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Since the data were collected in 1968, two new ones, the hoary bat and the coyote, have been recorded, and two others, the river otter and the red wolf, have been reintroduced.
Full Text:
Record #:
3167
Author(s):
Abstract:
While more people visit the Great Smoky Mountains National Park than any other, federal funding remains static, and services are declining. Alternatives include seeking more federal money or raising funds privately.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Winter 1997, p2,4, il
Record #:
11155
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is celebrating its 75th anniversary. Boykin recounts how a combination of politicians, businessmen, tourism boosters, local residents, and nature lovers brought the part into existence.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p86-90, 92, 94, 96, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
13167
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, located on the border of western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, is America's most visited national park. Funded by the United States Government and donations on behalf of John D. Rockefeller, the Great Smoky Mountains national park encompasses 507,159.16 acres.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 5, July 1954, p13-14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
14497
Abstract:
After the war, no community in western North Carolina will fail to be touched and changed by the drawing power of the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 4, June 1945, p6-7, f
Full Text:
Record #:
14598
Author(s):
Abstract:
Great Smoky Mountains National Park was less developed in North Carolina when compared to successful improvements to the park in Tennessee during the 1940s. Part of the problem was a Cherokee Reservation unwilling to compromise with government demands to upgrade and draw in more tourist profits. In 1946 the matter was not fully resolved because of increasing government demands met with an unyielding local population.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 18, Sept 1946, p3-4, 20, il
Full Text:
Record #:
15065
Author(s):
Abstract:
October marks the beginning of bear hunting season for the western forests of North Carolina. Much of the best bear hunting grounds in the southern Appalachians have been incorporated into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and has become a game refuge.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 22, Oct 1940, p1-2, 24-25, f
Full Text:
Record #:
15098
Author(s):
Abstract:
The oldest primitive house in western North Carolina was the Woody House. It was located in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park between the Big Catalooche and the Little Catalooche rivers and by best estimation dates to the late 1700s. The home is located on what was known as Love's Speculation, a land grant purchased by Colonel Robert Love after the Revolutionary War. Park administrators saved the building because it was the oldest and largest log cabin within its boundaries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 22, Nov 1941, p10, 30, il
Full Text:
Record #:
15174
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the development of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park the government was left with a dilemma of displacing people from their homesteads. Some residents left willingly but others less inclined to leave were granted a leasing option. Leases were short term but renewable and extended to the \"lifetime of persons now living within the park area.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 2, June 1938, p5, 7, il
Full Text:
Record #:
23638
Abstract:
Reintroduced elk are adjusting to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The elk were absent for nearly 150 years after over-hunting, but the National Park has worked to steadily increase elk numbers.
Record #:
24036
Author(s):
Abstract:
In order to protect the Great Smokey Mountains, scientists take to the conservancy each year to study the species there. This effort began in 1997 when the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory was launched. The focus of this program is to locate, study, describe, and catalog every living thing in the park.
Record #:
25781
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biologist Peter White codirects the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (ATBI), an ongoing project dedicated to preserving the Great Smoky Mountains National Park ecosystem. The ATBI has discovered over six thousand species new species in the park and aims to document every living species in the park.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Spring 2009, p5-13, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
8730
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the country's most popular park, is approaching fifty years of age. Corbett discusses the health of the park and what looms in its future.
Full Text:
Record #:
26887
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since European boar were introduced in 1912, these animals have spread throughout major portions of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Rooting damage caused by the boar could be decreasing the amount of available nutrients for the proper growth of trees. Wildlife biologists are conducting research to assess the extent of impacts and long-term changes.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p5
Record #:
7652
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the north shore of Fontana Lake lie 250,000 acres of Great Smoky Mountains National Park that are accessible only by boat. Few places in the park remain as remote, and the area is prized by fishermen, environmentalists, and others who appreciate its solitude. When the dam was completed in 1944, Swain County residents were promised a road to the homesteads made inaccessible by the dam. A seven-mile portion was built between 1948 and 1972, then construction stopped. A two-year environmental impact statement which will be finished in 2006 by the National Park Service will decide the fate of the area and the road. Igelman gives reasons for the region's popularity and the options available to the park to satisfy the 1943 agreement.
Source:
Full Text: