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7 results for Roads--North Carolina, Western
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Record #:
3409
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A new scenic highway opened in the western mountains in October, 1996. The Cherohala Highway, which connects Robbinsville, in Graham County, with Tellico Plains, Tennessee, provides scenic views of the Appalachian Mountains.
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Record #:
14090
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Diverging from the Blue Ridge Parkway, a new state highway opened up some of western North Carolina's mountains for visitors. The road was built to cut through Steppes Gap and through Mt. Mitchell State Park. Details of the new highway's destination include the allure of the Black Mountains, a diverging range from the Blue Ridge Mountains, and the charms of Mt. Mitchell State Park.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 7, July 1948, p3-4, 18, il
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Record #:
14548
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Originally there were the buffalo trails in western North Carolina. Then came the paths made by Indians, and finally the rough roads built by early settlers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 27, Dec 1945, p26-27, f
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Record #:
24334
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A planned extension of I-26 begins in Charleston, South Carolina and ends in Asheville, North Carolina. The project has angered environmentalists but much of the region’s business community anticipates and interstate that links western North Carolina to the Ohio Valley and industrial Midwest. This article examines the pros and cons of the expansion.
Record #:
24613
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U.S. Highway 276 is considered one of the most beautiful drives in North Carolina. The two-lane road crosses the South-North Carolina board 13 miles south of Brevard and winds for 63 miles through Dupont State Forest and Pisgah National Forest until it meets Interstate 40 near Waynesville. The scenic drive brings travelers close to Cold Mountain, Looking Glass Falls, and Connestee Falls, as well as other natural landmarks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p112-114, 116-118, 120, 122, 124, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26731
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The placement of roads in Western North Carolina dates to colonial times, when settlers created better roads (the Trading Ford, and the Trading Path) to connect themselves to the market of Asheville. Today, major highways cover much of the historic roads, utilizing the same area North Carolinians used hundreds of years before.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p72-75, 77, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7652
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the north shore of Fontana Lake lie 250,000 acres of Great Smoky Mountains National Park that are accessible only by boat. Few places in the park remain as remote, and the area is prized by fishermen, environmentalists, and others who appreciate its solitude. When the dam was completed in 1944, Swain County residents were promised a road to the homesteads made inaccessible by the dam. A seven-mile portion was built between 1948 and 1972, then construction stopped. A two-year environmental impact statement which will be finished in 2006 by the National Park Service will decide the fate of the area and the road. Igelman gives reasons for the region's popularity and the options available to the park to satisfy the 1943 agreement.
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