NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


3 results for Fontana Lake
Currently viewing results 1 - 3
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
20932
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the completion of Fontana Dam, a number of families were removed in 1943 from the part of the lake that came to be known as the North Shore. Part of their folk tradition was Decoration Day, or cleaning and decorating graves of family or soldiers. The people were promised an access road to the twenty-seven cemeteries after the war, and several sections were built. In the 1960s construction ceased. Jabbour recounts the work of Helen Cable Vance, her sister Mildred Cable Johnson, and the North Shore Historical Association in leading the movement to make access to the graves a reality.
Full Text:
Record #:
7652
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the north shore of Fontana Lake lie 250,000 acres of Great Smoky Mountains National Park that are accessible only by boat. Few places in the park remain as remote, and the area is prized by fishermen, environmentalists, and others who appreciate its solitude. When the dam was completed in 1944, Swain County residents were promised a road to the homesteads made inaccessible by the dam. A seven-mile portion was built between 1948 and 1972, then construction stopped. A two-year environmental impact statement which will be finished in 2006 by the National Park Service will decide the fate of the area and the road. Igelman gives reasons for the region's popularity and the options available to the park to satisfy the 1943 agreement.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
36480
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fontana Village’s lake is widely known as an appealing spot for fishers, boaters, hikers, and nature lovers. As for lesser-known aspect of Fontana Village, an example may be the origin of its dam. Constructed by local workers during WWII, Fontana Dam was an energy source for the secret atomic bomb mission research conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.