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9 results for Ecology and conservation--North Carolina
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Record #:
12727
Abstract:
During the closing days of 1931-1932, a period of time spanning less than 12 months, sea grass disappeared from the North Carolina sounds. Struck by a mysterious parasite, eelgrass disappeared in bodies of water throughout North America, Europe and the Mediterranean. Despite re-plantings of eelgrass to save ecosystems, the sea grass continued to die off until 1937 when it began growing again in the Chesapeake Bay area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 13, Nov 1961, p11-12, 22, il
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Record #:
25047
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Abstract:
Marc Basnight has been living on the outer banks since he was a child. He since has grown up to be a prominent fighter for the saving of the ecological systems at play.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2002, p11-15, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25781
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biologist Peter White codirects the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (ATBI), an ongoing project dedicated to preserving the Great Smoky Mountains National Park ecosystem. The ATBI has discovered over six thousand species new species in the park and aims to document every living species in the park.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Spring 2009, p5-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28586
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Abstract:
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and N.C. State University are tracking black bear movement in and around Asheville. This study is groundbreaking because it studies the habits of urban bears. Biologists have set up traps throughout Asheville and has collect3ed data on 153 different bears over the past three years by outfitting them with GPS radio collars, tattooing the bears, and attaching ear tags. The study will help determine if Asheville lies along a dispersal corridor for bears, as well as a source or sink population bears.
Record #:
30080
Abstract:
The genus Necturus is a group of aquatic salamanders commonly known as waterdogs and mudpuppies. Of the three species occurring in North Carolina, only the Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is endemic to the state. In 1978, a three-year study began to provide information on its life history, habitat preference, and preliminary conservation status.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p1-12, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30081
Abstract:
The Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is a totally aquatic salamander endemic to the Neuse and Tar River drainages of North Carolina. A study conducted from 1978 through 1980 documented the waterdog’s distribution, ecology and feeding habits. A conservation status of Special Concern may be warranted due the animal’s need for larger streams with relatively clean, flowing water.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p13-35, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
35871
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Abstract:
This feud’s source was not of the Hatfield and McCoy ilk: it was a refinery for Carteret County. Pete Dorrance owned the business he promised was economically sound and environmentally clean. Against it was John Costlow, director of Duke University Marine Laboratory. He asserted a threat of oil spills carried an ecological damage price tag too high to pay.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p14-17
Record #:
35896
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Crystal Coast included treasures not to be found in a chest or pirate ship. Included among the troves of visit worthy towns including the stretch between Beaufort and Cedar Island known as “the Original Downeast.” Proving its value of an historic sort entailed mention of Beaufort’s colonial roots and remembrance of Fort Macon as a Civil War battle site. As for personal historic merit, cited was Pine Knoll Shore’s connection to relatives of Theodore Roosevelt.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p27-33
Record #:
36292
Author(s):
Abstract:
A purported decline in overall paper use has not hurt business for Evergreen Packaging of Canton. The paper mill, established in the early 1900s, has a prominent place in the community, partly due to it being the county’s largest private employer. The business proves its keeping pace with the current ecologically conscious cultural climate through initiatives such as the coating on the material for its cup paperboard.